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12 results for Crabs
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Record #:
547
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Despite an injection of new technology, and a fresh look at old regulations, crab processing is still a labor-intensive industry.
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Record #:
1755
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This second installment in a three-part series continues an examination of crab-picking and the crab industry as it exists in Eastern North Carolina. Ruley places special emphasis on the folk aspects of the industry.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 12 Issue 27, July 1994, p10-13, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
1769
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Ruley presents the final article in her series chronicling the lives and the culture of those who work in the crab houses of eastern North Carolina.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 12 Issue 28, July 1994, p8-11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
1864
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Eastern North Carolina crab house owners are turning to labor imported from Mexico as a remedy for the dearth of willing crab pickers in this part of the state.
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Record #:
1865
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Eighty-three year-old Llewellyn \"Miss Lue\" Lewis, whose husband owns the Luther Lewis & Son crab plant in Davis, starting picking crabs at age fifty and now teaches the art to new pickers.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , July/Aug 1994, p8-11, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
5109
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Murray Bridges owns Endurance Seafood Company in Colington. Bridges has been selling peelers, or crabs that are about to shed their shells, for over twenty-five years. His company is the largest crab shedder in Dare County, and each year he sells over 50,000 dozen soft shell crabs. In 2000, soft shell crab sales were around $3.3 million and early in the 2001 season a dozen small crabs sold for $20 and a dozen jumbo crabs were $36.
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Record #:
10788
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An amazing number of crabs that vary in size, shape, and color inhabit the state's waters. Among them are the speckled crab, lady crab, black-fingered mud crab, ghost crab, and purse crab. Blue crabs are the major edible crabs in North Carolina and the state's most economically important seafood species.
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Record #:
21983
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Diane Lee was raised on the river and used to crab with her father. When she took up pottery, it seemed natural to include crabs. Although some potters paint their designs on pots, Lee says she never mastered painting. She creates the crabs in 3-D, and they appear on dishes, pots, lampshades, and other functional items.
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Record #:
24523
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The author recounts his experiences catching live blue crabs on the coast of North Carolina as a child. Today, the overall blue crab populations have been depleted as a result of overfishing, pesticides in the water, parasites, and disease.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 3, August 1977, p21-22, il
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Record #:
31158
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Soft crabs, also known as “peelers,” shed their shells between April and September. Fishermen at Benny’s Seafood in Manns Harbor of the Outer Banks, North Carolina, describe the shedding process, and how they catch blue crabs using a male crab called a “jimmy”. The Manns Harbor soft crabs are harvested and sold to buyers throughout the Eastern shore.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 35 Issue 8, Aug 2003, p10-11, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
36004
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Old time crabbing meant trot lines instead of wire pots, and income of three cents a pound versus the contemporary rate of twelve. From Edward Scarborough’s observations about facts like these, one ironic conclusion could be drawn. A better living could be made in the midst of the Great Depression than forty years later.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p18-21
Record #:
36015
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between the Coast Guard, naval yard, and commercial fisheries work of many kinds, Mr. Robert Watson Gray had gained almost a lifetime of maritime experience. After retirement, with much of his days taken up by fishing, he showed how the lure of the open sea still reeled him in.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p52-59