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7 results for Blue crab industry
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Record #:
547
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Despite an injection of new technology, and a fresh look at old regulations, crab processing is still a labor-intensive industry.
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Record #:
545
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Blue crabs and the blue crab industry are defining aspects of North Carolina.
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Record #:
4450
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There are around one million crab pots in state waters. Each year, through storms, boat props, and other mishaps, 10 percent break loose. Unfortunately, the pots continue catching blue crabs. Between eleven and twenty-five blue crabs die in each loose pot per season, a significant loss to the industry. In 1994, Irene Hooker began work on a crab pot with strings that dissolve after a season. Her work will ultimately cut blue crab losses from loose crab pots.
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Record #:
5930
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The blue crab industry is the state's largest commercial fishery. Henderson discusses the work being conducted by Joanne Harcke, which seeks to develop procedures for growing blue crabs in hatcheries to help replenish wild stocks. Harcke is conservation and research coordinator for the North Carolina Aquarium on Roanoke Island.
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Record #:
7736
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The blue crab is North Carolina's most valuable commercial fishery. The state was the top blue crab producing one between 1994 and 1999. In 2002, the state still accounted for 21 percent of the country's total harvest. A Blue Crab Research Program by North Carolina Sea Grant specialist Sara Mirabilio provides insight into crab harvests, management, and research. Green explains the project and takes the reader on a crabbing trip in the Currituck Sound.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2006, p17-21, il Periodical Website
Record #:
15600
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Blue crabs are North Carolina's most important fishery based on pounds landed, revenue generated, and jobs provided. Allegood discusses factors influencing the crab industry, such as storms that harm the habitat and a decline in dealers and processing plants; how the crabs are processed; and where they are shipped.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2011, p6-11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24523
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The author recounts his experiences catching live blue crabs on the coast of North Carolina as a child. Today, the overall blue crab populations have been depleted as a result of overfishing, pesticides in the water, parasites, and disease.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 3, August 1977, p21-22, il
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