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5 results for Scuppernong River
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Record #:
10665
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Abstract:
Lemuel Sawyer, an early 19th-century congressman, wrote this article concerning wine production in North Carolina in the 1840s. Sawyer notes that white grapes, such as the scuppernong, grow well in the sandy soils of Currituck County, Roanoke Island, and the Albemarle Sound regions. While most homes in this area had vines and produced wine in a \"rude\" way, with little filtration, no time for fermentation and the product being mixed with five gallons of apple brandy per barrel of wine, the results were, according to Sawyer, little more than preserved grape juice. Sawyer recounts his own experiment in which he attempted to produce a high quality wine and champagne from the scuppernong grape, the results of which he called \"fully equal to the celebrated product of France.\" He also notes that, given the wide availability of scuppernong grapes in the region, wine production in the area could be more profitable than farming or grazing.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 1, June 1969, p18-19
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Record #:
1643
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The Scuppernong River is the centerpiece of an ambitious plan, the Walter B. Jones Center for the Sounds project, that could save the river, protect vast areas of wetland habitat, and bring economic prosperity to Tyrrell County through increased tourism.
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Record #:
7357
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Lynch discusses the Scuppernong River. The headwaters originate in Lake Phelps. The river slowly flows through undeveloped swamp forest and agricultural land in Washington and Tyrrell Counties for twenty-six miles before emptying into the Albemarle Sound near Columbia. Lying in an isolated section of the state, the river has escaped pollution problems that plague other rivers. No houses or industries line its banks. Conservation agencies protect much of the floodplain.
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Record #:
38281
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Abstract:
The county seat of Tyrrell County is also the only town in the county, which was founded in 1793. It’s also defined as one is its identity as a singular town—one doctor, one lawyer, one pharmacy, one road. How it’s defined as two: Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds forming the second largest estuary in the country; two animals, the red wolf and red cockaded woodpecker, being protected species.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 6, Nov 2012, p46-50, 52, 54, 56-58, 60, 62, 64-65 Periodical Website