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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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13 results for Hiking
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Record #:
2331
Author(s):
Abstract:
For hikers there is no shortage of trails in the state's forests. With over a million acres of national and state parks, like Stone Mountain and Pisgah, choosing a trail might be more daunting than the actual hike.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 1, June 1995, p16-18, 20-21, il
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Record #:
3258
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Forests and parks across the state rank nationally in the top ten in hiking activity. Among the most popular are Grandfather Mountain, Uwharrie National Forest, Lake Brandt, and Portsmouth Island.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 45 Issue 2, Spring 1997, p2-6, il
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Record #:
4997
Author(s):
Abstract:
Russell takes an 11-mile trek with a group of over- sixty hikers, reenacting the trip taken in 1701 by English surveyor John Lawson from Occaneechi Village to Adshuseer. Russell discusses the effect of Lawson's journey on subsequent history and his own feelings on following the explorer's path.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 18 Issue 8, Feb 2001, p22-23, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6528
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Abstract:
Established in 1970, Raven Rock State Park is one of North Carolina's newest parks. It is located along the Cape Fear River and takes its name from the flocks of ravens that roosted there years ago. Its main feature is Raven Rock, which reaches a height of 152 feet and juts out at a forty-five degree angle above the river. Clemmons describes the location, length, and difficulty of the park's six hiking trails.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p46-47, il
Record #:
6561
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Abstract:
For mountain hikers, the northwestern part of North Carolina is hard to beat. Part of the attraction is that the mountain trails are closer to population centers, less crowded, and cooler in the summer than the better known ones in the Smokies. Johnson describes several of these mountains, including Mt. Mitchell, Grandfather Mountain, and Roan Mountain.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 5, July 1980, p53, 55, il
Record #:
24546
Author(s):
Abstract:
Glassy Mountain, a spur of the Blue Ridge Mountains, is located in Flat Rock, North Carolina and is a popular site for hikers wishing to visit the Connemara Trails in Henderson County. The author presents some of the area's historical highlights and things to do near the mountain.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 43 Issue 12, May 1976, p16-17, il
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Record #:
24577
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This article gives readers advice concerning hiking the section of the Appalachian Trail that traverses North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 10, October 1971, p8-10, il
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Record #:
26921
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This article highlights four lesser known places to hike with your dog in western North Carolina. Each location description provides directions and trail lengths.
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Record #:
3590
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hikers sometimes can experience injuries along the trail. However, many injuries, like muscle strain, can be avoided by understanding that walking in the city and walking in the woods require different styles.
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Record #:
14322
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Maxwell discusses the benefits of hiking or walking and lists a number of walking and hiking clubs around NC.
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Record #:
35679
Author(s):
Abstract:
Walking was recommended as part of backpacking and hiking experiences. For the best experiences, the author suggested considering supplies, rental prices, the pack’s weight, and ways to avoid littering. Sites such as Morrow Mountain State Park, the Blue Ridge Parkway, and Mount Mitchell were recommended. Included were tips for new backpackers and hikers.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978, p20-23