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14 results for Blue Ridge Mountains--Description and travel
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Record #:
1192
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Abstract:
Every year thousands of people travel to the Blue Ridge Mountains in mid-October to experience the wondrous peak of fall color. But tourism experts say that late September offers the best days for capturing the fall colors and missing the crowds.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 9, Sept 1993, p12-15, por
Record #:
10841
Author(s):
Abstract:
A theory advanced some time ago by Dr. F. W. Went, Director of the Missouri Botanical Gardens in St. Louis, offers the explanation that the blue haze commonly seen over the Blue Ridge Mountains is due to the presence of organic matter which drifts into the atmosphere from trees and plants growing on the mountains.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 35 Issue 7, Sept 1967, p9-10, il
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Record #:
13800
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article is about the unique nature of the Blue Ridge mountains.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 49, May 1952, p3-5, 27-28, map, f
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Record #:
24546
Author(s):
Abstract:
Glassy Mountain, a spur of the Blue Ridge Mountains, is located in Flat Rock, North Carolina and is a popular site for hikers wishing to visit the Connemara Trails in Henderson County. The author presents some of the area's historical highlights and things to do near the mountain.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 43 Issue 12, May 1976, p16-17, il
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Record #:
24676
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Abstract:
In an excerpt from ‘Letter from the Alleghany Mountains,’ 1848 traveler Charles Lanman (1819-1895) describes his arrival in Hickory Nut Gap, a gorge in the Blue Ridge Mountains, and his experience with Cherokees in Qualla Town.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 21, February 1955, p15-16, il
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Record #:
24687
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Abstract:
In an excerpt from ‘Letter from the Alleghany Mountains,’ 1848 traveler Charles Lanman (1819-1895) describes his experience traveling on the Blue Ridge in the direction of the Catawba River. He discusses Linville Falls, the Ginger Cake Mountain, and the hermit who lived there.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 24, April 1955, p11-12, il
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Record #:
24699
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author presents the history and appeal of the Toe River Valley, which is a valley by virtue of its drainage system and the high mountain ranges, such as the Black Mountains, Blue Ridge, and Unakas, that hem it in. The article highlights some of the popular tourist attractions in the area.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 2, June 1952, p3-5, 21-25, il
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Record #:
24712
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Abstract:
The author discusses his trip through the Piedmont to the Blue Ridge Mountains, with a particular focus on Asheboro.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 41, March 1952, p6-7, 16, il
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Record #:
31526
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Abstract:
The Green Mountain Resort is a multi-million-dollar oasis in the Blue Ridge Mountains, three miles north of Lenoir. It began in 1968 as a typical camping area and operated that way until a couple of years ago when developer Joel Dimmette decided to turn it into a luxury family camping resort. This article discusses development of the resort, amenities and attractions.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 12 Issue 5, May 1980, p18-19, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
35770
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Mountains were a valuable part of NC, the author proclaimed, initially measuring this value in the types of precious stones to be found in ranges such as Pisgah. Discussed later was their greatest source of wealth—the people. Such people included those there before the arrival of English settlers, such as the Cherokee. Such people included the generations of immigrants and present day resident of Appalachia. The author concluded that collectively they helped to make the area what it became.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p27-28,45
Record #:
35853
Author(s):
Abstract:
Railroading in this case involved Pullman cars. Riding the rails the fashioned way was still possible through the National Railroad Historic Society and smaller model railroad groups. Highlighting the difference of the train experience not by Amtrak were factors involved with steam and coal power locomotives. Illustrating the uniqueness also was a description of a trip starting in Roanoke and ending in Greensboro.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p17-19
Record #:
35920
Author(s):
Abstract:
Whether novice or expert, any visitor could venture the great outdoors from mountains to coast. Watercraft activities included canoeing in Chowan River and whitewater rafting in the Ocoee River. Adventure could be found in forests such as Nantahala through hiking and backpacking. For those mountain trekkers, there was horseback riding through the Great Smokies and rock climbing on Shortoff. Coastal Plain adventures included bicycling along the Manteo to Murphy stretch and hand gliding off of Jockey’s Ridge.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 5, May 1981, p49-52, 62
Record #:
36454
Author(s):
Abstract:
Western North Carolina played an important role in the state’s economic and occupational development, through its railroads delivering raw materials such as lumber and mica across the state. Pictorial evidence Western Carolina University preserves includes the accompanying photo of the Great Smoky Mountain Railroad. Through such endeavors, acknowledgment of railroads’ place in North Carolina history chugging along.