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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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21 results for Railroads
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Record #:
245
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Railroad and the Atlantic and North Carolina Railroad are little-known private corporations that own the vital rail transportation corridor cutting across the industrial Piedmont and on to the Atlantic Ocean.
Source:
NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 6 Issue 1, June 1983, p2-17, il, bibl, f
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Record #:
2854
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Abstract:
Railroads in the state have continued to prosper during the last fifty years despite a number of challenges, including mergers, changing engine technology, and competition from airline and trucking industries.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
4421
Author(s):
Abstract:
Four thousand miles of rail lines crisscrossed the state in 1900. Most of them belonged to the Atlantic Coast Line, Seaboard Line, and Southern Railway. In 1900, railroads were the major means of long-distance transportation. Railroads also brought changes. Farmers could raise cash crops now, instead of subsistence farming. New industries grew; old ones expanded. Railroads also influenced urbanization, creating new towns and increasing the size of old ones.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 39 Issue 1, Fall 1999, p32-33, il
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Record #:
5788
Abstract:
One of North Carolina's plans for decreasing highway congestion is the development of a train system that will compete with cars and airplanes. A high-speed rail system between Raleigh and Charlotte that will include seven stops is projected for completion in 2010.
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Record #:
8157
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Greensboro Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society recently held a special function for train lovers along the Carolina – Virginia special excursion. The old steam engine Number 611 departed Pomona train station in Greensboro for a round trip voyage to Roanoke, Virginia. During the trip, the train made several stops for photo opportunities. The daylong voyage took train passengers through Greensboro, Danville, Lynchburg, Ruffin, Reidsville, and Brown Summit.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 4, Sept 1984, p3, por
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Record #:
10715
Abstract:
The merger of the Piedmont & Northern Railway with the Seaboard Coastline Railway brings to an end one of the most remarkable and interesting companies that ever ran trains in North Carolina. At the start of its career, the line was little more than a new-built country trolley, but in its maturity, it was deemed more of a financial success than any other electric interurban railway in the United States.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 13, Dec 1969, p14-15, il
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Record #:
11133
Abstract:
Railroading began in North Carolina in 1833 when fifteen miles of track were laid from the Virginia border to the town of Weldon. Other construction would soon follow. Today, the Seaboard Coast Line Railroad, which came into being on July 1, 1967, has one-sixth of its total mileage, or 1,600 miles, in the state. Seaboard employs over 4,000 people with an annual payroll of $44 million.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 30 Issue 7, July 1972, p76-78, 108-109, il
Record #:
11418
Abstract:
There are twenty-four railroad companies operating in North Carolina, from the Aberdeen and Rockfish (46.92 miles) to the Yancey Railroad (12.83 miles). Gross revenues amounted to $227 million in 1972 in North Carolina alone. However, profits are not as bountiful as passenger travel declines and fuel prices go up. This article examines some of the problems facing railroads.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
11592
Abstract:
The Family Lines System, which is composed of five of the country's railroads, operates almost 1,900 miles of track in North Carolina. This is almost half of the state's total of 4,115 rail miles. The railroads are Seaboard Coast Line, Louisville & Nashville, Clinchfield, Georgia, and West Point.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 34 Issue 7, July 1976, p62-63, 94-95, il
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Record #:
14375
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's first railroad, Raleigh & Gaston Railroad, opened in May 1840. At the time, the railroad stretched between Raleigh and Wake Forest totaling 18 miles of track. It was a short lived state endeavor but laid the ground work for further railroad development.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 42, Mar 1949, p3, 17, il
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Record #:
15285
Author(s):
Abstract:
Early in the 1900s the railroad business was booming, and out of that era came the Atlantic and Western Railroad, one of the shortest but most profitable lines in North Carolina. A stock company was formed of Harnett and Lee County citizens who envisioned a mighty network of railroads leading out of the heart of North Carolina, but World War I came and virtually ended the history of the line and construction stopped at Lillington; the tiny train has been stopping there three times a day ever since in the 26-mile round-trip journey, popularly known as the Jitney Line.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 41, Mar 1940, p1, f
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Record #:
17193
Abstract:
The state of North Carolina owns approximately 72% of the outstanding capital stock of the Atlantic and North Carolina railroad, which has a line running from Goldsboro to the deep water port of Morehead City up to Beaufort.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 9 Issue 5-6, June 1943, p14-15
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Record #:
24177
Author(s):
Abstract:
Light rail in Charlotte created a construction boom as businesses cropped up along the rail route. Light rail may be the answer for North Carolinas bustling cities as it becomes more expensive to buy gas and park in town.
Record #:
24205
Abstract:
Plans to bolster rail service throughout Eastern North Carolina might make two ports more attractive to shipping lines, imports, and exports. This worries some farmers that the rail line will become slower and non-reliable when delivering much needed feed supplies.
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Record #:
24532
Author(s):
Abstract:
One section of the historic East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad is being saved and put to recreational use by taking tourists on rides through some of the most dramatic and beautiful sections of the track.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 6, November 1977, p18-20, il
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