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17 results for Lanman, Charles, 1819-1895
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Record #:
13208
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Written in 1848 and based on the travels of Charles Lanman, this article contains an excerpt from Lanman's book, Letters from the Alleghanies. This is the third article in a series by The State, detailing the mountains and western portion of the state prior to the Civil War. The first part of this series can be found in the September 1954 issue, Volume 22, Number 8, pages 10-11, 45. The second is in the September 1954 issue, Volume 22, Number 9, pages 10-12, 48.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 10, Oct 1954, p14-15, 27, il
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Record #:
13320
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Qualla Town, located in Haywood County, is an area encompassing 72,000 acres of land inhabited by the Cherokee and Catawba Native Americans. Divided into seven clans, each of which is managed by a chief, the indigenous peoples of this area still function and practice beliefs despite the widespread Native American removal that devastated tribes and belief systems elsewhere in North America.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 14, Dec 1954, p15-16, 24, il
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Record #:
13347
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In an excerpt from the 1848 book, Letters from the Alleghanies, Lanman offers an alternate view on Cherokee extermination within North Carolina. The first of two part series published by The State, Lanman discusses various Cherokee chiefs as well as religion.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 19, Feb 1955, p14-15
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Record #:
15642
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In this final excerpt from his 1848 book, Letters from the Alleghenies, Lanman sums up two months of travel on horseback through western Carolina in 1848.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 3, July 1955, p15-16
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Record #:
15720
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In an excerpt from his 1848 book, Letters from the Alleghenies, Lanman describes his six-mile hike to Alum Cliffs, which he called the chief attraction of the Smoky Mountains, and a stop-over in Qualla Town, which was about thirty miles from Franklin, and the home of a number of Cherokees. He comments on poor people, dogs, and insects.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 11, Oct 1954, p12-13, 40, il
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Record #:
15726
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In another excerpt from his 1848 book, Letters from the Alleghenies, Lanman describes his journey down the valley of the French Broad River to the old mineral springs resort.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 22, Mar 1955, p13-14, il
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Record #:
15733
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Leaving Asheville, Lanman continues his travels through the North Carolina Mountains and recording what he sees in his 1848 book, Letters from the Alleghenies. Among the descriptions are Linville Pinnacle, the Catawba Cave, Linville Falls, and the Ginger Cake Mountain. A hermit named Watson, who lived at the mountain's base and gave it its named, died in 1816. Lanman writes a long, interesting paragraph about him.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 24, Apr 1955, p13-14, il
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Record #:
15731
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In another excerpt from his 1848 book, Letters from the Alleghenies, Lanman reports his experiences on the day he returned to Asheville from his trip down the French Broad River. He witnessed a domestic quarrel between a young husband and wife and tells of an industrious Asheville landlady, who, after years of hardships, became successful.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 23, Apr 1955, p18
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Record #:
15736
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In two letters from his 1848 book, Letters from the Alleghenies, Lanman recounts two Cherokee legends about Black Mountain, later renamed Mt. Mitchell, and in the second letter tells of a strange man, named David Greer, who lived in a cave high on Bald Mountain fifty years before.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 26, May 1955, p10-11, il
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Record #:
15735
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Leaving Asheville, Lanman travels twenty-five miles northerly, recording his trip to Black Mountain, later renamed Mount Mitchell, in his 1848 book, Letters from the Alleghenies.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 25, May 1955, p17-18, il
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Record #:
24676
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In an excerpt from ‘Letter from the Alleghany Mountains,’ 1848 traveler Charles Lanman (1819-1895) describes his arrival in Hickory Nut Gap, a gorge in the Blue Ridge Mountains, and his experience with Cherokees in Qualla Town.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 21, February 1955, p15-16, il
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Record #:
24671
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In an excerpt from ‘Letter from the Alleghany Mountains,’ 1848 traveler Charles Lanman (1819-1895) describes his first encounter with a Tennessean horse trader in the Appalachian Mountains.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 20, February 1955, p17, 26, il
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Record #:
24678
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In an excerpt from ‘Letter from the Alleghany Mountains,’ 1848 traveler Charles Lanman (1819-1895) describes his experience in Qualla Town, in Haywood County. The town is occupied by Cherokee and Catawba Indians.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 14, December 1954, p15-16, 24, il
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Record #:
24683
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In an excerpt from ‘Letter from the Alleghany Mountains,’ 1848 traveler Charles Lanman (1819-1895) describes his experience traveling down the valley of the French Broad to Hot Springs.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 22, March 1955, p13-14, il
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Record #:
24687
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In an excerpt from ‘Letter from the Alleghany Mountains,’ 1848 traveler Charles Lanman (1819-1895) describes his experience traveling on the Blue Ridge in the direction of the Catawba River. He discusses Linville Falls, the Ginger Cake Mountain, and the hermit who lived there.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 24, April 1955, p11-12, il
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