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6 results for Haywood County--History
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Record #:
13287
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sharpe examines the history, geography, economic conditions, industries, agriculture, and culture of Haywood County.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 11, Aug 1953, p3-5, 20, 22, map, f
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Record #:
13798
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Abstract:
The last fighting of the Civil War continued in western North Carolina, sometime after Lee and Johnston had surrendered. It happened in Haywood County.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 49, May 1952, p9
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Record #:
18367
Author(s):
Abstract:
Continuing his travels around the state, Goerch describes the things of interest he found in Haywood County. The county has several peaks over 6,000 feet, huge apple orchards, large quantities of beef cattle, and years of interesting history. Champion Paper Company at Canton is one of the largest plants in the state and hires thousands of people.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 19, Oct 1941, p1-4, 22-25, il
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Record #:
21533
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Abstract:
This article examines the Appalachian Southern identity during the Civil War and Reconstruction. Contrary to 20th century historians' ideas of Civil War-era Appalachia as the pre-modern, unionist, and anti-slavery society, an analysis of a 1911 Waynesville, North Carolina, reception for the widow of Confederate hero Thomas J. \"Stonewall\" Jackson demonstrates that Appalachian communities not only supported the Confederacy but retained a strong identification with the myth of the \"Lost Cause\" into the 1910s. In the 1890s and 1910s reunions of Confederate veterans and celebrations of their military service were central to the public life of Haywood County, North Carolina.
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Record #:
24678
Author(s):
Abstract:
In an excerpt from ‘Letter from the Alleghany Mountains,’ 1848 traveler Charles Lanman (1819-1895) describes his experience in Qualla Town, in Haywood County. The town is occupied by Cherokee and Catawba Indians.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 14, December 1954, p15-16, 24, il
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Record #:
29876
Author(s):
Abstract:
Local author Wayne Caldwell has written novels on the annexation of Cataloochee in the early 1900s. Caldwell will lead a tour through the five remaining buildings in the Cataloochee Valley Historic Area. His personal ties to families in the area afford him stories unknown to most.
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