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3 results for Indians of North America--Religion
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Record #:
13320
Author(s):
Abstract:
Qualla Town, located in Haywood County, is an area encompassing 72,000 acres of land inhabited by the Cherokee and Catawba Native Americans. Divided into seven clans, each of which is managed by a chief, the indigenous peoples of this area still function and practice beliefs despite the widespread Native American removal that devastated tribes and belief systems elsewhere in North America.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 14, Dec 1954, p15-16, 24, il
Full Text:
Record #:
13347
Author(s):
Abstract:
In an excerpt from the 1848 book, Letters from the Alleghanies, Lanman offers an alternate view on Cherokee extermination within North Carolina. The first of two part series published by The State, Lanman discusses various Cherokee chiefs as well as religion.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 19, Feb 1955, p14-15
Full Text:
Record #:
7689
Abstract:
After the Civil War, laws passed by the North Carolina General Assembly to retain the power of the white community divided the races between \"white\" and \"colored.\" For the state's Native American population, this posed a problem. They could not attend white churches, and they feared attending black churches would cause them to lose their identity as Indians. Their solution was to build their own churches. In the eastern part of the state, missionaries and preachers had converted many Indians to Christianity by the late 1800s. Most of the churches built were either Baptist or Methodist. By the 2000, most of the state's 100,000 Indians follow these two denominations.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 1, Fall 2005, p14-15, il