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10 results for Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest (N.C.)
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Record #:
1247
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With the largest stand of virgin deciduous trees in the United States, the Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest near Robbinsville continues to fascinate all who walk through it.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 5, Oct 1993, p21-24, il, por
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Record #:
8764
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In this continuing series on the best walks to take in North Carolina, Setzer describes a walk among the towering trees of the mountains' primeval timberland, the Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest. A two-mile, figure-eight loop takes walkers past some of the country's oldest and largest trees east of the Mississippi, 450-year-old poplars, some measuring twenty feet in circumference. The forest was dedicated in 1936 to the soldier-poet Joyce Kilmer, author of “Trees,” who was killed on July 30, 1918, near the close of World War I.
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Record #:
8890
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The Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest is 3,800 acres of forest lying in Graham County. This ageless forest, the last virgin forest on the East Coast, has never been touched by an axe and will remain so. It was dedicated in 1936 to the American soldier-poet, Joyce Kilmer, who wrote the famous poem “Trees,\" and was later killed in World War I on July 30, 1918. Stephenson discusses what the future may be for the forest, how proposed additional roads will affect it, and what the public's responsibility is in maintaining it as Nature intended.
Record #:
9109
Abstract:
Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest in the Nantahala National Forest in western North Carolina is virtually untouched. Home of an impressive collection of the oak-chestnut trees, a virtually extinct species today, Joyce Kilmer Forest is truly a sight to behold. Deer, bear, fox, and bobcat live there, and the Civilian Conservation Corps laid countless forest trails through the woods for visitors.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 1, June 1976, p8-10, il
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Record #:
15321
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In 1936 a section of forest fourteen miles from Robbinsville was dedicated the Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest. The Graham County stand of virgin timber was highly prized for its beauty and serenity. The dedication was sponsored by the Bozeman Bugler post of the veterans of Foreign Wars because of Kilmer's service in World War I where he died in France at the Battle of the Wood of Burned Bridge.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 13, Aug 1937, p7, 24, il
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Record #:
24001
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Joyce Kilmer was an American poet, writer, and Sergeant, and is remembered in this article that details his impressive scouting operations into dangerous territory and his subsequent death in 1918 at the hands of a German sniper.
Record #:
8760
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Abstract:
On July 30, 1936, fifty guests and scores of U.S. Forest Service personnel gathered near Robbinsville to listen to a message from President Franklin D. Roosevelt dedicating the Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest. The forest, 3,800 acres of woodland lying in Graham County, is the last virgin forest on the East Coast and constitutes one of the remnants of the original forest that covered the slopes of the Appalachian Mountains. It has never been touched by an axe and will remain so. It was dedicated to the American soldier-poet, Joyce Kilmer, who wrote the famous poem “Trees,\" and was later killed in World War I on July 30, 1918.
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Record #:
35860
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For many towns in the Highlands, the past was within reach. Inns making times distant tangible included Green Park, modeled after the classic mountain hostel; Snowbird Mountain, with a proximity to Joyce Kilmer Forest; and High Hampton, whose land was once part of Civil War general Wade Hampton’s estate. Other lodgings offering an experience not to be found in history books, they included Eseeola Lodge, on the National Register of Historic Places; the Weld House, with boarding house origins; and Appalachian Inn, offering home-grown meals and a bell summoning guests to dinner.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p58-60
Record #:
35920
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Whether novice or expert, any visitor could venture the great outdoors from mountains to coast. Watercraft activities included canoeing in Chowan River and whitewater rafting in the Ocoee River. Adventure could be found in forests such as Nantahala through hiking and backpacking. For those mountain trekkers, there was horseback riding through the Great Smokies and rock climbing on Shortoff. Coastal Plain adventures included bicycling along the Manteo to Murphy stretch and hand gliding off of Jockey’s Ridge.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 5, May 1981, p49-52, 62
Record #:
37608
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Abstract:
Captured through the vast views of Aycock Brown, Hugh Morton, and Bill Russ was nearly a century of North Carolina life and images of beautiful landscapes and historic landmarks. Eighteen of their photos, taken at places like Jockey’s Ridge, the Smoky Mountains National Park, and the Wrightsville Beach Bridge, are showcased in this collection.
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