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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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11 results for Mountains
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Record #:
8236
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Abstract:
There are over fifty mountains in North Carolina that reach heights of over 6,000 feet, making the state the home of the highest ranges on the East Coast. Hairr describes a number of them, including Great Balsam Mountains, Plott Balsam Mountains, Great Craggy Mountains. Unaka Mountains, Black Mountains, and the Great Smoky Mountains.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p42-44, 46, 48, 50, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
13220
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This article is taken from the 1881 travel book. This excerpt details the background of the Alleghany Mountains from the view of the Indian population.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 25, May 1956, p19-20
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Record #:
13386
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In Watauga County, Rich Mountain - 15 miles long and without a break - bears down directly from the north. About half way of its length, the ridge beings to bend toward the southeast, and then it terminates in a prominence known as Howard's Knob. At the other end is Tater Hill, a 5,194 foot mountain.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 17, Sept 1953, p3-4, 21, map, f
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Record #:
13551
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There is only one Big Bald of the Bald Mountain Range and it is a mountain of legend and mystery.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 48, May 1954, p24-25, 27, f
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Record #:
27401
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This photographic essay is of pictures of the mountains of western North Carolina in the early winter.
Record #:
35805
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Of the many “blink and you’ll miss it” size NC towns, Browns Summit could have made the list. A company’s good business reputation gave this tiny town some renown, though, along with assuring that broom-making was not yet a dying art.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p13
Record #:
35225
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Abstract:
Touchstone Energy Cooperatives boasted that the Tarheel State’s cultural and natural landscape is as sundry as its inhabitants. When it comes to NC’s main mountain range, outdoor activities such as the Appalachian National Scenic Trail can offer new meaning to the great outdoors. For Piedmont Region travelers who are military buffs, Greensboro offers a Revolutionary War battle site in its Guildford Courthouse National Military Park. As for what the other end of NC’s climatic spectrum offers, visiting the Outer Banks lighthouses can provide a treasure trove of memories.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 48 Issue 4, April 4 2016, p45-64
Record #:
35875
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Abstract:
The gamut of the Mountain experience, the author asserted was in the touted “heart of the Great Smoky Mountains.” Giving authenticity were descriptions of Soco Gardens Zoo; Meadowbrook Resort; Red Barn Gift Shop; and authentically recreated western town, Ghost Town in the Sky.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p31-33
Record #:
35870
Author(s):
Abstract:
A popular vacation spot for people from both sides of the Mason-Dixon Line, the Outer Banks retained a mystique. This quality, Wise claims the other area noted, the Mountains, lacks. He noted it as an irony: the Mountains have retained a claim to the past that granted it legend status.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p13
Record #:
35860
Author(s):
Abstract:
For many towns in the Highlands, the past was within reach. Inns making times distant tangible included Green Park, modeled after the classic mountain hostel; Snowbird Mountain, with a proximity to Joyce Kilmer Forest; and High Hampton, whose land was once part of Civil War general Wade Hampton’s estate. Other lodgings offering an experience not to be found in history books, they included Eseeola Lodge, on the National Register of Historic Places; the Weld House, with boarding house origins; and Appalachian Inn, offering home-grown meals and a bell summoning guests to dinner.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p58-60
Record #:
35911
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lodging profiles boasting hospitality offer a mountain of proof. Those with long standing reputations: Fairfield Inn, established 1896; Monte Vista Hotel, established 1919; Stonehearth, presently an inn, formerly antique shop and restaurant. Lodgings with a more recent reputation for comfort: Hound Ears Lodge and Club, Floridians comprising fifty percent of membership; Waynesville Country Club Inn, guest list including fraternities on ski trips; and Fontana Village Resort, fireplaces in their rooms; Sunshine Inn, inspired by the bed and breakfasts in Ireland.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Jan 1981, p46-47