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14 results for Highlands--Description and travel
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Record #:
2671
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located in the state's southwestern mountains, the Highlands and Cashiers area is one of the South's most popular vacation areas.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 54 Issue 1, Jan 1996, p44, il
Record #:
3043
Author(s):
Abstract:
Highlands is the state's highest town at 3,838 feet. In addition, the Macon County town is famous for its waterfalls, which are attractive to tourists, retirees, and second home owners. Highlands also offers many cultural and outdoor activities.
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Record #:
8774
Author(s):
Abstract:
Just outside Highlands, in Horse Cove, stands a 145-foot yellow poplar tree that dwarfs all other surrounding trees, including several red oak trees. Scientifically known as LIRIODENDRON TULIPIFERA, the Horse Cove Poplar is commonly called the tulip poplar. The Wasilik Poplar, another yellow poplar located in North Carolina, was the national champion in the American Forestry Association's registry of big poplar trees until a larger tree was discovered in Bedford County, Virginia.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 11, Apr 1982, p19-20, il
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Record #:
13785
Author(s):
Abstract:
Highlands is high up and one of North Carolina's most unusual communities.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 48, Apr 1952, p14-16, f
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Record #:
16571
Author(s):
Abstract:
Highlands, located in Macon County, is featured in OUR STATE magazine's Tar Heel Town of the Month section. Among the sights to see are the Old Edwards Inn and Spa, Ugly Dog Pub, Highlands Nature Center, the Waterfalls, the Highlands Inn, the Highlands Hill Deli, and the Mountain Fresh Grocery.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 11, Apr 2012, p40-44, 46-48, 50, 52-53, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
28371
Author(s):
Abstract:
The history and livelihoods of North Carolinians who live in the Appalachian Mountains is discussed. The economic struggles of those who live in the area are described. The history of the craft movement, Vanderbilt’s construction of the Biltmore Estate, the types of crops grown, and tourism in the area are all detailed. Floyd Wilson of Yancey County and Red Alderman of Avery County share how they make a living in the mountains crafting jewelry and farming primrose.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 10 Issue 35, August-September 1992, p6-7 Periodical Website
Record #:
35648
Author(s):
Abstract:
The marquis of Main Street wasn’t a man who’d inherited the title by virtue of birth. In this case, it was a beagle hound named Bowser who “earned” his title by becoming a well-known and loved figure in the town of Highlands.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 3, May/June 1978, p20-21
Record #:
36968
Author(s):
Abstract:
Profile was that year’s solar eclipse, a total solar eclipse in history touted as viewable in towns such as Franklin, Sylva, and Highlands. Included in the profile were other contributions that western North Carolina has made to the field of astronomy. In the early 1960s, NASA established a satellite tracking station in Transylvania County, now called the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute. That institute became a site of research for this eclipse.
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Record #:
35856
Author(s):
Abstract:
Experiencing seasons Tar Heel State style and NC from the Crystal Coast to the Mountains was possible through a visit to Gastonia’s Schiele’s Museum. Illuminating the enlightening experience: information about the museum’s murals and slide shows describing the natural history and ecology of NC’s three regions.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p28-29
Record #:
35859
Abstract:
Cherokee referred to a Highlands town and people residing on its reservation. Information about this Native American tribe could be discovered in a guided tour of Oconaluftee Village and places such as a wax museum. Artistic expressions of information inspired by the area’s mythical origins included Little People and This Haunted Land.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p54-56
Record #:
35845
Author(s):
Abstract:
For recreation, rest, and resort like residency, the author proposed resorting to Wolf Laurel, Foxfire, and Bald Island. The mountains’ Wolf Laurel offered horseback riding and hiking. For golfers, the Highlands’ Foxfire offered outings galore on the green. Bald Island offered lovers of the great outdoors acreage of palm trees and evidence (at least tracks) of wildlife like cougars.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Mar 1980, p31-32, 46
Record #:
35860
Author(s):
Abstract:
For many towns in the Highlands, the past was within reach. Inns making times distant tangible included Green Park, modeled after the classic mountain hostel; Snowbird Mountain, with a proximity to Joyce Kilmer Forest; and High Hampton, whose land was once part of Civil War general Wade Hampton’s estate. Other lodgings offering an experience not to be found in history books, they included Eseeola Lodge, on the National Register of Historic Places; the Weld House, with boarding house origins; and Appalachian Inn, offering home-grown meals and a bell summoning guests to dinner.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p58-60
Record #:
36282
Author(s):
Abstract:
Perks such as a plethora of parks and recreation sites, hotels and golf courses, mountain villages and museums equaled a substantial contribution to the tourist industry. Among the sites North Carolina offered for travel and recreation were Fort Fisher, Whirligig Park, Levine Museum, Highlands, and Old Edwards Inn.
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Record #:
40463
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hugh MacRae Morton, famed photographer, had an appreciation of the area around Grandfather Mountain perhaps more akin to individuals like John Muir, co-founder of the Sierra Club. As for Morton's grandfather and former owner of Grandfather Mountain, Hugh McRae, his appreciation of the region leaned more toward development than conservation, as demonstrated by his ownership of Linville Improvement Company.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 87 Issue 4, September 2019, p200-202, 204, 206 Periodical Website