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7 results for Piedmont--History
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Record #:
13121
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina was a favorite hunting destination for wealthy sportsmen in the early to mid-part of the 20th-century. A number of hunting lodges were built, and among the ones built in the Piedmont, Fairview Park stands out for its luxuriousness. The 17,000-square-foot building burned on the night of March 31, 1921.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 6, Nov 2010, p150-152, 154,156, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
19541
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rev. Rights attempts to reconstruct the state's Native American history through sparse historical records. Specifically, the article records tribes' history within the Piedmont region in Orange, Chatham, Wilkes, Carbarrus counties. He studies material culture to better understand the Native American population that once inhabited the Piedmont.
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Record #:
25587
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located in Iredell County, Mooresville was built nearly a century ago around a textile mill. But during the past two years 800 people have lost their textile jobs because of plant closings or permanent layoffs. Textiles have been one of the big three industries in North Carolina. But in 1982, the state had more plant closings than any other state. Inexpensive foreign labor has made it hard for American companies to compete with imports.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 2 Issue 12, June 22-July 5 1984, p1, 4-5, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
28130
Author(s):
Abstract:
Progressive changes have taken place in the Triangle art scene and the area’s performance venues over the last 25 years. There have been changes in the location of the state art museum, renovations at the Raleigh Memorial Auditorium, the addition of Durham’s Performing Arts Center, and renovations of UNC’s Memorial Hall. The history of opera, ballet, theater over the last 25 years and their place in the community are also detailed.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 15, April 2008, p49 Periodical Website
Record #:
35821
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stonework experienced a renaissance in counties like Orange and Macon. The comeback had come from masons Steve Magers, Lyn Walters, Suzanna Stewart, and Tom and Joe Kenlan. Their chimneys were featured as an illustration of stonemasonry at its most creative.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Feb 1980, p44-45
Record #:
35858
Author(s):
Abstract:
The lure of the river also known as the Lumbee has inspired a litany of written works in the past century. They ranged from a poem by John Charles McNeill to Robesonian Historical Edition, from William Haynes’ Outing and Field and Stream articles to Hall’s Wilmington Gazette.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p48-49
Record #:
35856
Author(s):
Abstract:
Experiencing seasons Tar Heel State style and NC from the Crystal Coast to the Mountains was possible through a visit to Gastonia’s Schiele’s Museum. Illuminating the enlightening experience: information about the museum’s murals and slide shows describing the natural history and ecology of NC’s three regions.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p28-29