NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


9 results for Robeson County--History
Currently viewing results 1 - 9
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
5964
Abstract:
Blackburn discusses the Lowry Gang, a notorious band of murderers and thieves who plundered and ravaged Robeson County in the decade after the end of the Civil War.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 3 Issue 4, Sept/Oct 1975, p18-21, il, por
Record #:
13689
Author(s):
Abstract:
Encompassing 9 towns and 944 square miles, Robeson County is expanding in population as well as in agricultural production. The first eastern county to abolish alcohol, Robeson was the first rural county in America to have a health department.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 26, Nov 1952, p3-5, 33-34, il
Full Text:
Record #:
13697
Abstract:
Formed in 1787 from Bladen County, Robeson County was named for Colonel Thomas Robeson. Encompassing 604,160 acres, approximately half of which is forests, Robeson has the largest acreage under cultivation in North Carolina. Statistics related to population, rainfall, temperature, agricultural production, and wages, are given.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 26, Nov 1952, p36
Full Text:
Record #:
13696
Author(s):
Abstract:
St. Pauls, Red Springs, Rowland, Pembroke, Maxton, Parkton, and Lumberbridge - all towns in Robeson County - have changed dramatically since the 18th century. Brief histories, facts, and statistics about these towns are presented.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 26, Nov 1952, p28-31, il
Full Text:
Record #:
24588
Author(s):
Abstract:
Andy Winecoff went by the nickname ‘Shake’ and was a notorious lawbreaker in Robeson County who was able to escape the gallows after a Governor of North Carolina pardoned him of his crimes. This article presents the life and exploits of ‘Shake.’
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 13, December 1971, p17-18
Full Text:
Record #:
31593
Author(s):
Abstract:
: In southeastern North Carolina the remains of what could have been ossuary burial practices have been observed since the late 1800s. In 1884 J. A. Holmes observed that the burial mounds in Duplin, Sampson, Robeson, Cumberland, and southern Wake counties had certain common characteristics. In this article Hogue outlines methods for analyzing the skeletal material found in these ossuaries.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
32685
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are many Asbury churched in North Carolina: this particular one with the interesting minute book is located down I Robeson County. This minute book contains such entries and marginal notes as detailed accounts of the church’s parishioners and those who are no longer members.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 9, Jul 1944, p5
Full Text:
Record #:
35858
Author(s):
Abstract:
The lure of the river also known as the Lumbee has inspired a litany of written works in the past century. They ranged from a poem by John Charles McNeill to Robesonian Historical Edition, from William Haynes’ Outing and Field and Stream articles to Hall’s Wilmington Gazette.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p48-49
Record #:
39663
Author(s):
Abstract:
Surrounding the murders of Jimmy Earl Cummings, Joyce Sinclair, and Julian Pierce, the author documented the rallies and funerals for the victims.