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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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13 results for Womick, Chip
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Record #:
12041
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Asheboro, county seat of Randolph County, is featured in Our State magazine's Tar Heel Town of the Month section.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 10, Mar 2010, p26-28, 30-33, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
12051
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Jerry Neal along with two partners founded RF Micro Devices in 1991. A year later the workforce had expanded to ten. Within a decade the company had over $1 billion in annual sales. Today there are over 4,000 employees in 27 locations. The company makes and sells a range of semiconductor components used in many fields.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 11, Apr 2010, p48-50, 53, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
12050
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Originally the property of a Winston-Salem furniture executive, Camp Raven Knob, a 3,200-acre reservation in Surrey County, has been a boy Scout camp for over fifty years.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 11, Apr 2010, p38-40, 42, 44, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
12302
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Twenty years before settlers of The Lost Colony vanished from Roanoke Island and forty years before Jamestown, Spanish explorers led by Juan Pardo built a fort in Burke County in 1567. Called Fort San Juan, it was razed by Indians in 1568. Archaeologist David Moore from Warren Wilson College is conducting excavations on the site.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 1, June 2010, p40-42, 44, 46, 48, 50 , il Periodical Website
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Record #:
13121
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North Carolina was a favorite hunting destination for wealthy sportsmen in the early to mid-part of the 20th-century. A number of hunting lodges were built, and among the ones built in the Piedmont, Fairview Park stands out for its luxuriousness. The 17,000-square-foot building burned on the night of March 31, 1921.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 6, Nov 2010, p150-152, 154,156, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
13270
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William Henry Belk opened his first department store in Monroe in 1888. Womick recounts the history of the company founded by this pioneering merchant.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 7, Dec 2010, p42-46, 48, 50, 52, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
13813
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Vito and Mary Ellen Sico began collecting antiques for their home. Soon their collection became a business that later inspired the Liberty Antiques Festival. This festival is held twice-a-year and attracts hundreds of vendors and thousands of shoppers from almost two dozen states.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 11, Apr 2011, p94-96, 98, 100-102, 104-105 Periodical Website
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Record #:
14978
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Mount Gilead, located in Montgomery County, is Our State Magazine's featured Tar Heel Town of the Month.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 4, Sept 2011, p28-34, 36, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17790
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Three places in North Carolina claim to be the original Jugtown--a true testament to the tradition of pottery in the state.
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Record #:
24786
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Luck’s cannery in Randolph County got its start in 1947 when Alfred Spencer partnered with Ivey Luck to build the cannery in Seagrove, North Carolina. The company got a slow start, but with the help of local radio broadcaster, Tommy Floyd, Luck’s became a household name. The company has faced many changes over the years, including the addition of more products and selling the company to Arizona Canning Company in 2011.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 8, January 2016, p108-110, 112, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
17418
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Morris illustrates how the pufferfish can blow itself up to a large size.
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Record #:
38293
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How he fulfills the roles of preservationist and collector: amassing items such as 18th-century Kentucky longrifles, 19th-century salt-glaze pottery, furniture from the 18th century; amassing stories of the people who made these items. In the process, he saves the items and their history, almost palpable beneath their materials, not for just his own pleasure or fulfillment. The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts and individuals who share his twin passions may have such item available for generations to come.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 11, Apr 2011, p128-130, 132, 134-135 Periodical Website
Record #:
38264
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The Asheboro Zoological Park, cited as the largest walk-through, natural-habitat zoo in the world, includes in its experience 30,000 plants and 1,100 animals. From the experience, its rare plant curator hopes visitors become more sensitive to the cause of saving endangered species, mindful of laws related to endangered species, and see all living things as worthy of life.
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