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13 results for Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (Winston-Salem)
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Record #:
2785
Author(s):
Abstract:
Founded in 1965, the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MEDSA) in Winston-Salem houses reconstruction's of actual rooms from historic houses located across the South.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 55 Issue 10, Mar 1988, p8-11, il
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Record #:
19007
Abstract:
The one hundred year span from the American Revolution to the Industrial Revolution produced a myriad of changes in the decorative arts, with changes in style reflecting the changing socioeconomic and political atmospheres of the time.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 5 Issue 2, Winter 2005, p3-5, f
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Record #:
27571
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts has begun an extensive research program into southern newspapers published pre-1821. Some areas, such as North Carolina, have made strong archival efforts and the state’s papers have already been microfilmed. Material related to decorative arts is being copied and indexed, and will be available to students and researchers.
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Record #:
27825
Abstract:
The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) includes artifacts from seven different states—North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Maryland, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Virginia. The decorative arts refer to objects created for domestic use such as furniture, pottery, and candles. The museum has objects dating from the establishment of Jamestown until the beginning of the Civil War. These pieces of art tell stories of a way of life very different from our own.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 10, March 2017, p130-134, 136, il, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
27849
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) in Winston-Salem, North Carolina organized the Index of Early Southern Artists and Artisans, which is published in five issues. The index contains every artist and artisan documented by MESDA since 1985 and their records of southern material culture. This issue covers artisans with the last names beginning with A through C.
Record #:
27856
Author(s):
Abstract:
Frank Horton established the Journal of Early Southern Decorative Arts in 1975 to disseminate research and collections by the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. This issue is a biography of Frank, his accomplishments, and contributions to the decorative arts.
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Record #:
27852
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) in Winston-Salem, North Carolina organized the Index of Early Southern Artists and Artisans, which is published in five issues. The index contains every artist and artisan documented by MESDA since 1985 and their records of southern material culture. This issue covers artisans with the last names beginning with D through H.
Record #:
27853
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) in Winston-Salem, North Carolina organized the Index of Early Southern Artists and Artisans, which is published in five issues. The index contains every artist and artisan documented by MESDA since 1985 and their records of southern material culture. This issue covers artisans with the last names beginning with I through O.
Record #:
27854
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) in Winston-Salem, North Carolina organized the Index of Early Southern Artists and Artisans, which is published in five issues. The index contains every artist and artisan documented by MESDA since 1985 and their records of southern material culture. This issue covers artisans with the last names beginning with P through S.
Record #:
27855
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) in Winston-Salem, North Carolina organized the Index of Early Southern Artists and Artisans, which is published in five issues. The index contains every artist and artisan documented by MESDA since 1985 and their records of southern material culture. This issue covers artisans with the last names beginning with T through Z.
Record #:
27859
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Bivins, Jr. served ten years as editor of the Journal of Early Southern Decorative Arts. In memory of John, this issue presents several of his editorial commentaries and articles he wrote for The Luminary newsletter.
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Record #:
35729
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Museum of Early Southern Decoration Arts, located in Winston-Salem, contained rooms and galleries with furniture and decorations from the Colonial to Victorian periods. The author noted each space represented Southern craftsmanship, taste, and culture from such historic eras.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p45
Record #:
38293
Author(s):
Abstract:
How he fulfills the roles of preservationist and collector: amassing items such as 18th-century Kentucky longrifles, 19th-century salt-glaze pottery, furniture from the 18th century; amassing stories of the people who made these items. In the process, he saves the items and their history, almost palpable beneath their materials, not for just his own pleasure or fulfillment. The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts and individuals who share his twin passions may have such item available for generations to come.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 11, Apr 2011, p128-130, 132, 134-135 Periodical Website