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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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24 results for Material culture
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Record #:
23836
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The Brady C. Jefcoat Museum in Murfreesboro, North Carolina displays the collection of Brady Jefcoat. There are more than 16,000 items in the collection, some dating back to the Great Depression. Most of the artifacts are old household items like washing machines, radios, and plumbing hardware.
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Record #:
27572
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The discovery of three groups of chairs with related design and construction characteristics, and with early histories based near the Fredericksburg-Falmouth area of Virginia has prompted further appraisal of chair-making in the region. Each chair features a crest rail, which may be characteristic to Tidewater Virginia down into the Albemarle Sound region of North Carolina.
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Record #:
27585
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In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the area that is now Shenandoah County, Virginia served as a principal migration route from Philadelphia to North Carolina. Trade centers and developers in the region brought together a variety of cultures. This diversity created one of the most interesting American regional styles in decoration and craftsmanship.
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Record #:
27586
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Research by the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts has revealed much about the material culture of Germans in piedmont North Carolina, but less is known about their history in South Carolina. The discovery of illuminated manuscripts called fraktur indicate German settlement in the Dutch Fork area, and a mix of religious and cultural influences on art.
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Record #:
27583
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Neoclassical and Empire are two major styles of brass andiron produced in Charleston, South Carolina. These two styles were brought to light through an analysis of Charleston brass founders conducted at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
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Record #:
27636
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Delftware was a variety of ceramic wares offered by British merchants in the eighteenth century. Researchers at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina conducted a study of delftware and found a connection to socio-economic structure in Kent County, Maryland.
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Record #:
27696
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Researchers at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina conducted a survey of upholstery practices in South Carolina during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The inventories of early householders tell us what people needed and used, and are an expression of personal taste during that time period.
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Record #:
27699
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Researchers at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina examined the jewelry styles prevalent in the Chesapeake during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth century. Portraits of Chesapeake ladies reveal significant information about the most personal aspects of material wealth and culture, and the use of jewelry in economic and social structure.
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Record #:
27708
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The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina conducted a study of 17th, 18th, and early 19th century Charleston estate inventories. Analysis revealed that Neoclassical dining rooms were not designed solely for the purpose of eating. The upper-class used dining rooms to display the wealth of glassware and silver to impress friends and business acquaintances of the owner.
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Record #:
27724
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Brass andirons, fenders, and candlesticks have surfaced and reattribute the materials discussed in a 1979 essay. New patterns and features on the items expand the repertoires of the andiron groups. The materials were produced in Charleston, South Carolina and are in collection at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
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Record #:
27726
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Rosewell was the eighteenth century mansion of the Page family in Virginia, but only its ruins remain today. Continuing studies provide insight into the ceremonial and ritualistic workings of Rosewell. Although specific knowledge about Rosewell’s interior is scant, conclusions can be made about the family and their perceptions of themselves through the house’s overall design and furnishings.
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Record #:
27849
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The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) in Winston-Salem, North Carolina organized the Index of Early Southern Artists and Artisans, which is published in five issues. The index contains every artist and artisan documented by MESDA since 1985 and their records of southern material culture. This issue covers artisans with the last names beginning with A through C.
Record #:
27852
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The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) in Winston-Salem, North Carolina organized the Index of Early Southern Artists and Artisans, which is published in five issues. The index contains every artist and artisan documented by MESDA since 1985 and their records of southern material culture. This issue covers artisans with the last names beginning with D through H.
Record #:
27853
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The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) in Winston-Salem, North Carolina organized the Index of Early Southern Artists and Artisans, which is published in five issues. The index contains every artist and artisan documented by MESDA since 1985 and their records of southern material culture. This issue covers artisans with the last names beginning with I through O.
Record #:
27854
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) in Winston-Salem, North Carolina organized the Index of Early Southern Artists and Artisans, which is published in five issues. The index contains every artist and artisan documented by MESDA since 1985 and their records of southern material culture. This issue covers artisans with the last names beginning with P through S.