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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Ceramics
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Record #:
23985
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David Voorhees is a local artist out of Asheville, North Carolina who creates stunning ceramics, such as bowls, pitchers, and teapots, and paints them based on inspirations from the mountains.
Record #:
27570
Abstract:
An inkstand made by John Bell in 1825 is the first inscribed American tin-glazed pottery to be discovered. The tin-glaze technique was introduced by German potter Carl Eisenberg who visited Salem, North Carolina in 1793. Since tin-glaze was so uncommon at the time, many questions remain unanswered regarding Bell’s apprenticeship, influences, and products.
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Record #:
27636
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Delftware was a variety of ceramic wares offered by British merchants in the eighteenth century. Researchers at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina conducted a study of delftware and found a connection to socio-economic structure in Kent County, Maryland.
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Record #:
29841
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The southern Appalachian region claims a rich history of ceramics and Western North Carolina is home to some of the woodfire field’s top artists and a number of young artists leading the field in new directions. Throughout June, the Asheville Area Arts Council presents an exhibition of works which demonstrate how potters influence each other’s art as they work together.
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Record #:
35119
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Abstract:
Edmond Boudreaux chronicled an updated ceramic development of the Town Creek Region, needed in light of the area’s extensive excavation history. Parts of this chronology included a description of the South Appalachian Mississippian Tradition, the six steps of the ceramic analysis for the author’s research, the use of multiple seriation methods, earlier research by Oliver (1992) proposing the groups of pottery fell into three ceramic phases. The excavation’s sites, typology for the pottery, and Ford seriation graphs were featured in figures. Tables contained seriation data and Mississippi period radiocarbon dates. Pottery images were located in Appendix A.