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13 results for Potters
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Record #:
1459
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Abstract:
Sid Oakley, an internationally renowned potter and painter, creates his art at Cedar Creek, a ten-acre enclave of studios, kilns, and a showroom in southern Granville County.
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North Carolina Home (NoCar NA 7235 N8 N32), Vol. 2 Issue 5, Oct 1993, p16-18, por
Record #:
2425
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Founded before the Civil War, the town of Whynot, population 100, has been slow to change. Once a stop along the 129-mile plank-toll road from Fayetteville to Salem (Winston-Salem), it is now home to potters and Lucks Canning Company.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 3, Aug 1995, p14-15, il
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Record #:
2807
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For his book on the state's pottery tradition, TURNERS AND BURNERS, University of North Carolina folklore professor Charles Zug visited a number of potters, like Burlon Craig, and also rolled up his sleeves to get the feel of the clay.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 12 Issue 3, Dec 1995, p18-19, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
3800
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In November, 1998, the North Carolina Pottery Center opens in Seagrove. The culmination of sixteen years of planning and raising funds, the Center seeks to make the public aware of the state's rich pottery history and traditions. Educational programs, exhibits, and collection and preservation are among activities to promote this.
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Record #:
6260
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Twenty square miles of land in the Piedmont, touching Moore, Montgomery, and Randolph Counties, have become famous in recent years for reviving the art of traditional pottery. The first known potter was J. D. Craven, who settled there in 1857. Of the forty or so shops that operated in the region, only a half dozen remain today. Moose discusses the potters and their craft.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p45-47, il, map
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Record #:
7940
Author(s):
Abstract:
The master potter Ben Owen passed his talents on to his namesake and grandson, Ben Owen III. Ben Owen III gained national recognition at age eighteen because of his unique work with pottery, including plates, jars, pots, and vases. Owen Pottery is located in Moore County. It is one of several pottery dealers on Highway 705.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 12, May 1987, p12-13, il
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Record #:
8279
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Abstract:
\"American Cameo\" pottery was a highly prized art pottery produced by Asheville native Walter B. Stephen at his Pisgah Forest Pottery. The cameo style of pottery uses raised paintings applied with a sharp brush and then glazed. Stephen's work was well known throughout the United States before his death in 1961. The art form is not being lost, as other pottery artists are producing cameo work. Marjorie Pittman and Judy Petrie produce \"Carolina Cameo\" in their Catawba County studios, while Rodney Leftwich produces cameo pottery at his Asheville workshop.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 8, Jan 1985, p24-25, por
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Record #:
8649
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North Carolina has been one of the nation's leaders in the production of homemade pottery for more than two centuries. In Catawba Valley, only one pottery craftsman remains. Burlon B. Craig of Henry opens his kiln only three or four times a year, and collectors come from all over the country to buy his pieces. Five-gallon jugs that now sell for $20 once sold for only $.50. Craig still digs his own clay and refuses to use commercial glazes on his pottery. An entire chapter of the POTTERS OF THE CATAWBA VALLEY, published in 1980 by the Ceramic Circle of Charlotte, is devoted to Craig.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 2, July 1981, p8-9, il
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Record #:
9315
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Douglas Ferguson, world-renowned potter and owner of Pigeon Forge Pottery, created and donated a mural called “Heritage” to his alma mater, Mars Hill College. The work is now valued at over $125,000. Ferguson used memories of his childhood to construct the mural as a way for current students to appreciate the work and consider it their own.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 11, Apr 1980, p18-19, il, por
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Record #:
21732
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This article examines the late North Carolina potter Jacob Meyer with particular focus on his apprenticeship and the apprenticeship system created by the colony of North Carolina with regards to its similarities to the Moravian system of mutual responsibility. While discussing Meyer's apprenticeship experience, the deficiencies of the master-apprentice relationship of second-generation Moravian settlers in North Carolina are revealed.
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Record #:
27570
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An inkstand made by John Bell in 1825 is the first inscribed American tin-glazed pottery to be discovered. The tin-glaze technique was introduced by German potter Carl Eisenberg who visited Salem, North Carolina in 1793. Since tin-glaze was so uncommon at the time, many questions remain unanswered regarding Bell’s apprenticeship, influences, and products.
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Record #:
5775
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North Carolina has a rich pottery tradition stretching from the present-day back to Native Americans 2,000 or 3,000 years ago. From its early utilitarian days, pottery has evolved into an art form. At one time there were over 200 potteries in the Seagrove area, and some potters working there today are ninth-generation. House discusses pottery and places in the state to view it.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 35 Issue 3, Mar 2003, p22-24, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
35113
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This article was a lead in for “The Last of the Iroquois Potters,” M.R. Harrington’s 1909 study of traditional Cherokee ceramics produced during the Qualla periods in what is now Cherokee, NC. Brett Riggs and Christopher Rodning’s article focused on other archaeologists from Harrington’s time and characteristic features of pottery produced particularly during the Qualla periods. Also noted were other discoveries of Iroquois pottery in Southeast regions such as Georgia and the continuation of this pottery’s production into the twenty first century.