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29 results for Pottery
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Record #:
2807
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For his book on the state's pottery tradition, TURNERS AND BURNERS, University of North Carolina folklore professor Charles Zug visited a number of potters, like Burlon Craig, and also rolled up his sleeves to get the feel of the clay.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 12 Issue 3, Dec 1995, p18-19, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
3800
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In November, 1998, the North Carolina Pottery Center opens in Seagrove. The culmination of sixteen years of planning and raising funds, the Center seeks to make the public aware of the state's rich pottery history and traditions. Educational programs, exhibits, and collection and preservation are among activities to promote this.
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Record #:
5736
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Sandy Cole is a ninth-generation potter of the famous Cole family that has been producing pottery in the state for around 200 years. She and her husband Kevin Brown market their wares from North Cole Pottery in Sanford. Whimsical face jugs are their newest creations. Carter discusses the family's artistic work and the origins of face jugs.
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Record #:
6260
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Twenty square miles of land in the Piedmont, touching Moore, Montgomery, and Randolph Counties, have become famous in recent years for reviving the art of traditional pottery. The first known potter was J. D. Craven, who settled there in 1857. Of the forty or so shops that operated in the region, only a half dozen remain today. Moose discusses the potters and their craft.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p45-47, il, map
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Record #:
8389
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In 1916, Jacques Busbee and his wife providing a market by selling North Carolina Pottery in their New York City tearoom. In 1922, Jacques opened Jugtown Pottery in Moore County to train and encourage younger local potters. As well as producing traditional wares of the region, such as whisky jugs, storage jars, and pie dishes, he began introducing more decorative vases based on Chinese and Korean forms he found in museums and library books. The tremendous success of Jugtown Pottery led to the revival of production among other potters in the Moore County area. Jacques Busbee died in 1947, and the Jacques Busbee Memorial Collection later became part of the North Carolina Museum of Art.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 12, May 1984, p16, 64, por
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Record #:
8704
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Contemporary potter Julia Rush and her friend Dot Warren visited many folk potters from Seagrove to Jugtown to see how pottery has changed. There are potters and shops all along the western side of the state, the best known being at Jugtown. Hundreds of potters have done apprenticeships there, spending a year or two doing production pottery.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 8, Jan 1982, p18-20, 53, il
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Record #:
8790
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Asheville Potter Karen Newgard transforms clay into elegant porcelain cups, bowls, pitchers, and platters. Newgard graduated from Louisiana State University with an art degree. Milling discusses technique and creations.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 11, Apr 2007, p216-218, 20, 222, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
13968
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The basic material in antique Wedgwood plates may have come from the land of the Cherokees more than 200 years ago.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 31, Dec 1950, p3, 22
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Record #:
16350
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Starting with the pots themselves, Zug attempts a history of North Carolina folk pottery, focusing on its European ancestry, various designs, and contemporary equivalents.
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Record #:
16512
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Jugtown, as we know it today, was started in 1917 by Jacques Busbee, an artist from a famous old North Carolina family. In the early days, most potters had made jugs for distilleries. When prohibition was enacted, much of the North Carolina pottery making stopped. A few potters kept at their trade, making jars, churns, crocks, and pie dishes. In fact, you might credit the staring of Jugtown to a pie dish.
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Record #:
19203
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Discoveries of ancient relics, including pottery, relate interesting information about the lives of the various Native American tribes who lived in North Carolina. Signs of Native American occupations have been found in all the state's one hundred counties. Rights relates some of the findings.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 30, Dec 1943, p5-6, il
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Record #:
20363
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When archaeological investigations began at Brunswick Town in the 1950s, numerous fragments of decorative tin-enameled tile were recovered from three structures. The decorative motifs represent nine distinct styles and help archaeologists discern the history of delftware ceramics in the Americas.
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Record #:
20362
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Among the historical foundations and items of historical interest at the excavations at Brunswick Town, pottery sherds are of particular interest, being a unique style to the region.
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Record #:
21501
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In 1737, Andrew Duche was the first English colonist in the new world to make porcelain from clay he received from the Cherokee Indians of western North Carolina. After initial enthusiasm and financial success, sales in porcelain from Cherokee clay waned until the 1760's. In 1767, potter Josiah Wedgwood of England reintroduced the product to the British Empire when he acquired Cherokee clay from the Cherokee village of Ayoree in western North Carolina. This was done through the work of his agent, Thomas Griffiths, who also provided a trove of information about Cherokee society and Indian-English trade relations.
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North Carolina Historical Review (NoCar F251 .N892), Vol. 63 Issue 4, Oct 1986, p477-510 , il, por, map, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
21888
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This article discusses Andrew Duche, an 18th century potter who worked with porcelain while traveling through North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. Reputed to be one of the South's earliest stoneware producers, Duche was also heavily involved in Southern politics during his travels throughout the region.
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