NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


10 results for New River
Currently viewing results 1 - 10
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
3998
Author(s):
Abstract:
The South Fork of the New River flows through Ashe and Allegheny Counties in an unusual western, instead of eastern, direction. Saving it from a hydroelectric project was a fourteen-year struggle; designation as a national Wild and Scenic River assured it.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
5893
Author(s):
Abstract:
The New River, which flows about 100 miles through western North Carolina, is at 300 million years, second only to the Nile River in age. A dam threatened the river with extinction in 1965, but legal and legislative action over a ten-year period saved it. In 1975, the North Carolina General Assembly declared 26.5 miles a State Scenic River. In 1976, the federal government declared the same stretch part of the National Wetland and Scenic River System.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
9327
Author(s):
Abstract:
South Fork of the New River is a part of the oldest river system in North America. The gentle mountain river remains one of North Carolina's best-kept travel secrets providing the perfect setting for leisurely canoeists and nature and wildlife enthusiasts. The river is in danger from both ends due to rapid development around Blowing Rock and Boone, and from efforts of the Appalachian Power Company of Virginia seeking to permit damming.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 2, July 1974, p11-14, il
Full Text:
Record #:
24345
Author(s):
Abstract:
After environmentalists fought the construction of a dam on the New River, it was added to the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System in 1976. Many houses were then built on the banks of the river because of its beautiful scenic reputation. Critics claim today that preventing the dam inadvertently caused development on the river, ultimately undercutting its beauty.
Record #:
16102
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1976, the Department of Cultural Resources dispatched a team of archaeologists to the New River Basin in the western portion of the state. Their task was to survey the area and assess any culturally significant material before a proposed hydroelectric project began. They identified two hundred sites and determined that the area had been occupied as early as 8,000 B.C.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 17 Issue 1, Fall 1977, p29-32, il
Full Text:
Record #:
8016
Author(s):
Abstract:
The New River in western North Carolina is the continent's oldest river at one billion years. It is second globally in age only to the Nile River. In 1976, the part of the river that flows through Ashe and Alleghany counties was named a Wild and Scenic River by the federal government. The designation saved the river from a massive dam and reservoir project. Such designation is given only to rivers free of impoundments and having watersheds and shorelines largely undeveloped but accessible in places by roads. Venters discusses a new foe facing the river--extensive development and its effect on the river.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
706
Author(s):
Abstract:
When the New River in Ashe and Allegheny counties was named a Wild and Scenic River in 1976, many citizens breathed a sigh of relief. Now the New River is engaged in a crucial battle with residential developments.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
28571
Author(s):
Abstract:
Good fishing can be found at most of the state parks in North Carolina. The best places to fish, the type of fish stocked at each park, and the best times of year to fish are described for 12 state parks. The fishing at Lake Norman, New River, South Mountains, Jordan Lake, Kerr Lake, Morrow Mountain, Fort Fisher, Fort Macon, Merchants Millpond, Pettigrew, Hanging Rock, and Eno River State Parks are all detailed. Hanging Rock, Eno River, and Fort Macon are highlighted with anecdotes and advice from parks employees and local fishing experts.
Record #:
32441
Abstract:
For the past few years, there has been debate over a proposal to dam the New River in northwestern North Carolina for hydroelectric power. The dam could also create a major tourist attraction, and supply water for Greensboro, High Point, and Winston-Salem.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 33 Issue 12, Dec 1975, p37-38, por, map
Record #:
35920
Author(s):
Abstract:
Whether novice or expert, any visitor could venture the great outdoors from mountains to coast. Watercraft activities included canoeing in Chowan River and whitewater rafting in the Ocoee River. Adventure could be found in forests such as Nantahala through hiking and backpacking. For those mountain trekkers, there was horseback riding through the Great Smokies and rock climbing on Shortoff. Coastal Plain adventures included bicycling along the Manteo to Murphy stretch and hand gliding off of Jockey’s Ridge.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 5, May 1981, p49-52, 62