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7 results for Archaeology--North Carolina
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Record #:
12142
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located on the Hiwassee River, in North Carolina, the Peachtree Indian Mound and Village is home to a marker that signifies this area as not only an occupation point of local Cherokee Native Americans but also a location visited by De Soto during the Spanish Expedition of 1540. Two archaeological excavations have produced numerous finds indicating a continued Cherokee population from 1300 AD through 1540.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 12, Nov 1956, p26
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Record #:
16956
Author(s):
Abstract:
While the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers prepared a site to build the Falls of the Neuse Dam and Reservoir in 1978, the crew encountered remains of a historic dam. John W. Clauser, Jr. led a team of archaeologists from the Division of Archives and History to record and salvage the 1830s dam. The site was likely part of the area's rich paper mill industry.
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Record #:
18871
Abstract:
The Upper Catawba Archaeological Project, lasting from June to October, presented successful excavations of two large late-prehistoric Indian villages in Burke and McDowell counties.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 66, Dec/Jan/Feb 1986, p18, f
Record #:
26247
Author(s):
Abstract:
UNC archaeologists are excavating several Piedmont sites along the Dan River, and studying the impact European colonists had on the established native settlements. These sites were occupied by Siouan Indians until they became in contact with European traders.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 6 Issue 4, Summer 1989, p5-7, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
16102
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1976, the Department of Cultural Resources dispatched a team of archaeologists to the New River Basin in the western portion of the state. Their task was to survey the area and assess any culturally significant material before a proposed hydroelectric project began. They identified two hundred sites and determined that the area had been occupied as early as 8,000 B.C.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 17 Issue 1, Fall 1977, p29-32, il
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Record #:
29135
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tucker R. Littleton is remembered for his contributions to the field of archaeology. Tucker recorded over 1,000 archaeological sites in North Carolina. Most of the sites were in the southern coastal region of the state and were among the first recorded in their counties. Tucker is remembered for his ethical archaeological research as he donated most of his materials to the public so that they can be preserved and appreciated by locals and the widest possible audience.
Record #:
35112
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between 1982-2002, archaeological expeditions of the Southern Coastal Plains yielded explanations for unique cultural development patterns among inhabitants such as the Iroquois and Algonkian. Such patterns, referred to by Joel Gunn as a “cultural anvil,” were especially the case during prehistoric periods, as well as global and ice ages. The author explained that this phenomenon occurred because by the Coastal Plain’s lack of natural enclosures. The phenomenon was particularly observed in ceramic artifacts.