NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


6 results for Dams--North Carolina
Currently viewing results 1 - 6
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
12139
Abstract:
In 1825, the State of North Carolina engaged the services of Hamilton Fulton, described as a distinguished engineer from England, to ascertain the importance, practicability, and expenses of re-opening the inlet at or near Nag's Head. Fulton's report favored changes and commenced a quarter century of agitation to accomplish the most state's ambitious and fascinating project to that time. This article is a two-part series and the first part of this series can be found in the following issue, October 1956, Vol. 24, No. 11, p9-10.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 12, Nov 1956, p10-11, il
Full Text:
Record #:
12138
Abstract:
The largest pump in the world has just been installed in Cherokee County. Capable of pumping 1,750,000 gallons of water per minute, the pump was installed at TVA's Hiwassee Dam and will serve as a combined pump and turbine.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 12, Nov 1956, p9, il
Full Text:
Record #:
16956
Author(s):
Abstract:
While the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers prepared a site to build the Falls of the Neuse Dam and Reservoir in 1978, the crew encountered remains of a historic dam. John W. Clauser, Jr. led a team of archaeologists from the Division of Archives and History to record and salvage the 1830s dam. The site was likely part of the area's rich paper mill industry.
Source:
Record #:
17401
Abstract:
The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) began its first North Carolina-based project in July 1936. Fowler Bend Dam on the Hiawassee River was the first of the foundations navigation and flood control projects outside of Tennessee or northern Alabama. The project was intended to promote navigation during drought, manage flood damage, and generate electricity.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
25593
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located in Transylvania County, the Horsepasture River (also known as “The Land of the Waterfalls”) is being considered a prime spot to build a dam to produce hydroelectric power. Environmentalists say the project would destroy the scenic and recreational value of the falls.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 2 Issue 16, Aug 31-Sept 13 1984, p3, 5, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
33406
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Federal Emergency Management Agency has published the results of a 1985 survey to assess the effectiveness of the states’ efforts to insure the safety of non-federal dams within their borders. North Carolina’s dam safety program is rated “adequate” and the state is considered “progressive” in its efforts to advance dam safety.
Subject(s):