NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


13 results for Jordan Lake
Currently viewing results 1 - 13
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
712
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jordan Lake has become a regular stop for bald eagles, and there's even a special observation station where visitors can watch these magnificent guests.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
27135
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 2009, the North Carolina legislature launched SolarBees, a two-million dollar pilot program to test a cheaper water-cleaning alternative in Jordan Lake. Last week, the Department of Environmental Quality abandoned the SolarBees project because data indicated it was completely ineffective. Now the state must get serious about water quality in the lake that provides drinking water to Wake and Chatham counties.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 19, May 2016, p7, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
27915
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pollution in the form of garbage is a problem at Jordan Lake. The handful of organizations who are in charge of the lake are not in charge of cleaning up the garbage. The work of cleanup is left to volunteers. Many individuals and groups are helping, but the one million visitors and the Haw River that feed the lake just keep bringing more. The garbage harms wildlife and pollutes the water.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 18, May 2010, p8-9 Periodical Website
Record #:
28055
Author(s):
Abstract:
For the third time in three years, Durham’s government officials have moved a protective boundary around Durham. The county commissioners recently accepted a developer’s survey of the lake. This will allow for a housing and shopping complex to be built within the lake’s watershed. The decision will likely result in lawsuits. The history of the zoning of the lake over the last ten years is detailed.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 26 Issue 41, October 2009, p5 Periodical Website
Record #:
28083
Author(s):
Abstract:
Superior Court Judge Howard Manning has ruled in favor of Southern Durham Development and their project to develop land around Jordan Lake. The development was disputed because some argued the development fell within the protected zone around the lake. Manning stated that the fight that happened as a result was due the planning department and their mistakes. Many residents are upset as the development may threaten Jordan Lake and increase pollution in the area.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 26 Issue 52, December 2009, p7-8 Periodical Website
Record #:
28571
Author(s):
Abstract:
Good fishing can be found at most of the state parks in North Carolina. The best places to fish, the type of fish stocked at each park, and the best times of year to fish are described for 12 state parks. The fishing at Lake Norman, New River, South Mountains, Jordan Lake, Kerr Lake, Morrow Mountain, Fort Fisher, Fort Macon, Merchants Millpond, Pettigrew, Hanging Rock, and Eno River State Parks are all detailed. Hanging Rock, Eno River, and Fort Macon are highlighted with anecdotes and advice from parks employees and local fishing experts.
Record #:
31373
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thurman F. Nance of Lee County is known as the “admiral” of Jordan Lake, where he operates a lakeside boat rental service. Nance was active in efforts to develop the New Hope Dam and helped create the reservoir during the 1950s. Since the opening of Jordan Lake Rentals in 1982, Nance’s business has grown steadily into a year-round operation.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 16 Issue 11, Nov 1984, p10-11, por
Record #:
33185
Author(s):
Abstract:
Uncertainties about the use of Jordan Lake as a public water supply remain strong. Of major concern are toxic substances from industries and farms in the watershed. A recent report from the North Carolina Division of Environmental Management examines the suitability of Jordan Lake as a water resource, and lists eight main sources of toxicants in the watershed.
Record #:
33178
Author(s):
Abstract:
Early study results confirm that Jordan Lake is one of many eutrophic lakes in North Carolina, but apparently, severe water quality problems have not yet arisen. With funding from the University of North Carolina Water Resources Research Institute, the first stage of a study of the productivity and nutrient status of phytoplankton in Jordan Lake has been completed.
Record #:
33193
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina Natural Resources and Community Development announced a series of nutrient-removal study grants to help local communities control discharges of nitrogen and phosphorus into Jordan Lake and Falls of the Neuse Lake watersheds. The grants stem from a growing concern about possible extensive growth of nuisance blue-green algae in the two reservoirs.
Record #:
33295
Author(s):
Abstract:
Six communities in southwestern Wake County have expressed a desire to use water from Jordan Lake. Jordan Lake has a long history of debate over its quality as a source of drinking water. The Environmental Management Commission will decide how to allocate water from the lake based on studies and requests.
Record #:
33494
Author(s):
Abstract:
In May, the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission proposed regulations for allocating water supply from Jordan Lake. The rules set out a process to guide water supply allocation but do not allocate the water to specific users. The proposed rule would also require that fifty-percent of the water supply remain unallocated in first-round allocations.
Record #:
34117
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Water Resources is reviewing comments in preparation for making final recommendations for allocating water supply storage in Jordan Lake to local water authorities. In a draft allocation plan, the towns of Cary and Apex and Chatham/Orange Counties will receive all the water supply they requested to fill immediate need, but most long-range allocations will be deferred.