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5 results for Pettigrew State Park
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Record #:
4230
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pettigrew State Park, covering parts of Tyrrell and Washington Counties, attracts visitors with its abundant wildlife, including red wolves, deer, and foxes; history, featuring Somerset Place, 4,400-year-old Algonquian dugout canoes, and Confederate General Johnston Pettigrew's grave; and Lake Phelps, providing great bass fishing and fall waterfowl viewing.
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Record #:
14706
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pettigrew State Park is located on the shores of Lake Phelps in Washington and Tyrrell Counties. The park named for General James Johnston Pettigrew and is located on portions of two fine old plantations.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 15, Sept 1944, p8, 26, f
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Record #:
9472
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this continuing series of articles on North Carolina's state parks, Constantino discusses Pettigrew State Park, which lies in Washington and Tyrell counties and features many natural and recreational attractions. The historic Somerset Place Plantation, the home of the Josiah Collins family, is located there and is administered by the state as a historic site.
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Record #:
28571
Author(s):
Abstract:
Good fishing can be found at most of the state parks in North Carolina. The best places to fish, the type of fish stocked at each park, and the best times of year to fish are described for 12 state parks. The fishing at Lake Norman, New River, South Mountains, Jordan Lake, Kerr Lake, Morrow Mountain, Fort Fisher, Fort Macon, Merchants Millpond, Pettigrew, Hanging Rock, and Eno River State Parks are all detailed. Hanging Rock, Eno River, and Fort Macon are highlighted with anecdotes and advice from parks employees and local fishing experts.
Record #:
35566
Author(s):
Abstract:
A guide was offered in terms of history, recreational activities, and nearby waterways through state parks. Profiled were Fort Macon, Hammocks Beach, Pettigrew, Somerset Place, Jones Lake, Singletary Lake Group Camp, Masonboro, and Cliffs-of-the-Neuse. Proof of eight wonders of the world, they were ones also perhaps not known to the international traveler.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p16-18, 29