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6 results for Fort Macon (Carteret County)--History
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Record #:
1401
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fort Macon, built between 1826 and 1834 in Carteret County, is a popular tourist spot and a witness to decades of North Carolina history, including the April 25, 1862, Civil War battle.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Nov/Dec 1993, p13-18, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3910
Author(s):
Abstract:
Built on Bogue Banks in the early 19th-century for coastal defense and to protect Beaufort harbor, Fort Macon fired its guns in anger only once -- during the Civil War. Today it is a 385-acre state park that attracts one million visitors annually.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 66 Issue 5, Oct 1998, p74-77,79-80,82, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
12553
Abstract:
Containing small summaries of the six towns in Warren County, this article supplies dates of establishment, information about commerce, as well as the accoutrements in Warrenton, Littleton, Norlina, Ridgeway, Macon, and Vaughan.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 30 Issue 11, Oct 1962, p19-20, il
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Record #:
14693
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1947, the military once again deserted Fort Macon and the historic work was turned over to the Division of Forestry and Parks, which planned to reopen the fort as a park. Brig. General Simon Bernard, Napoleon's military engineer, designed the fort and construction began in 1826. In 1862, Fort Macon fell to General Burnside's Union troops in battle during the Civil War.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 49, May 1947, p3, 28, il
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Record #:
14824
Author(s):
Abstract:
Original fortification at Fort Macon was constructed in 1712 to protect Bogue Sound and the port at Beaufort from Spanish attack. The historic structure that stood in 1943 was constructed in 1824 and named after Senator Nathaniel Macon who obtained Federal funds for the project. The fort was then scene for further conflict during the Civil War. Confederates controlled the fort from 1861 to 1862 when Federals overtook Beaufort. In 1943, architect Finlay Ferguson, Jr. was placed in charge of the fort's restoration.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 11, Aug 1943, p12-13, 18, por
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Record #:
35566
Author(s):
Abstract:
A guide was offered in terms of history, recreational activities, and nearby waterways through state parks. Profiled were Fort Macon, Hammocks Beach, Pettigrew, Somerset Place, Jones Lake, Singletary Lake Group Camp, Masonboro, and Cliffs-of-the-Neuse. Proof of eight wonders of the world, they were ones also perhaps not known to the international traveler.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p16-18, 29