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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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18 results for Habitat conservation
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Record #:
1299
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A wide variety of birds, insects, mollusks, and other creatures exist at the ocean's edge, which is why beachgoers should respect the creatures and refrain from disturbing their habitat.
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Record #:
1937
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Instituting a new definition of \"critical habitat\" for freshwater fish and mussels may be North Carolina's most important conservation battle of the year. The new definition would require a conservation plan for 25 streams where the species live.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 42 Issue 2, Spring 1994, p6-7, il
Record #:
2396
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Critics of the Endangered Species Act contend that animal rights take priority over those of landowners. Three state landowners whose property provides a habitat for three different species show that profit can be realized and wildlife also protected.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 43 Issue 2, Summer 1995, p2-5, il
Record #:
2953
Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Federation's list of the five most endangered state habitats includes the spruce fir forests in the Great Smoky and Black mountains and the Pamlico and Albemarle sound estuaries.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 44 Issue 3, Summer 1996, p2-6, il
Record #:
4744
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Early-successional habitats are areas of a mountain forest that are beginning to recover from events like fires, storms, or logging. First come grasses, then shrubs, and finally trees. All of these stages are important to wildlife survival. Earley discusses the value of early-successional habitats for mountain wildlife, their growing rarity, and what steps are being taken to maintain them.
Record #:
6606
Abstract:
Realizing that wildlife needs adequate habitat to survive and to produce good hunting, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission inaugurated a farm game restoration program. This article summarizes the program and describes three valuable wildlife plants - bicolor lespedeza, sericea lespedeza, and multiflora rose - which are very useful in North Carolina for wildlife habitat development without altering other land-use activities.
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Record #:
9364
Abstract:
The reason for planting food and cover plants like lespedeza is to produce an ample supply of good feed for birds and animals. The authors discuss a new method of planting.
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Record #:
18571
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Eight North Carolina conservation organizations, which represent over 100,000 citizens, have joined together to promote common goals for wildlife habitats across the state. This article describes the work of the group and the impact of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Farm Bill on wildlife habitats on private lands.
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Record #:
6623
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The principal objectives for planting food and cover plants like bicolor lespedeza and multiflora roses are to produce an ample supply of good feed for birds and animals on a small amount of land, furnish protection from weather and predators, and, as a result, produce more game for sportsmen. Bird discusses follow-up care needed after the initial planting to ensure permanent growth.
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Record #:
9785
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Who gets to use the state's lands and for what purpose? For the wildlife and plants that inhabit it, who speaks for their needs? In this first of a four-part series, Earley examines critical areas where habitat is falling to development, such as the Carolina bays.
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Record #:
9790
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Who gets to use the state's lands and for what purpose? For the wildlife and plants that inhabit it, who speaks for their needs? In this third of a four-part series, Earley examines the forestlands. In North Carolina 75 percent of the forestland is in small, privately held sections. For many owners profit is the main concern, with the needs of wildlife placed second.
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Record #:
9794
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Who gets to use the state's lands and for what purpose? For the wildlife and plants that inhabit it, who speaks for their needs? In this concluding section of a four-part series, Earley says that the future of wildlife in North Carolina will depend on finding new and innovative ways to preserve habitats.
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Record #:
26872
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Many of the nation’s best remaining wildlife habitats are threatened by uncontrolled population growth and development. A report by the National Wildlife Federation examined ten endangered habitats in need of federal protection. These areas include the Bridger-Teton National Forest, Columbia River Basin, California Desert, Chesapeake Bay, Mississippi Delta, Adirondack Lakes, prairie potholes, tallgrass prairies, and barrier islands of the East and Gulf Coast.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 12, Dec 1981, p14, il
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Record #:
6007
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To preserve plant and animal species, whether endangered or not, habitats must be preserved. The boundaries, appearance, and functions of habitats must be protected. Nickens discusses five habitat types that are endangered: mountain bogs, diabase glades, longleaf pine forests, maritime forests, and freshwater streams of the Piedmont.
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Record #:
28570
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With the projects described, land owners can welcome more wildlife onto their property. Some easy projects to help welcome wildlife include creating a mini food plot, creating brush piles, cutting standing softwoods, creating an early successional area, girdling non-masting trees, and leaving standing den trees. The importance of planning, directions how to complete each project, and which types of wildlife will be attracted by these projects are all detailed.