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3 results for Reptile populations
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Record #:
25011
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sea turtles are in trouble. The leading factor is development of beaches. With off road vehicle tracks, and human foot prints, baby turtles get stuck and eventually eaten. Other factors affecting their journey to the ocean are street lights, raccoons, and foxes.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 8 Issue 5, May 1981, p3-4, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4606
Author(s):
Abstract:
The diamondback turtle has survived for thousands of years, but the 19th- and 20th centuries challenged its existence. In the 19th-century, over-harvesting depleted fisheries to satisfy gourmet tastes for turtle meat. In the 20th-century, lost crab pots entrap and kill the turtles, while sprawling coastal development destroys its habitat. It is this loss of habitat that threatens the diamondback most in the 21st-century.
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Record #:
30027
Abstract:
The Gulf Coast spiny softshell turtle (Apalone spinifera) is a wide-ranging species found throughout North Carolina and other states along the Atlantic Ocean. The first record of this species in Norfolk, Virginia was observed in 1991. The Virginia population may be related to the population based in Harnett County, North Carolina.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 18, June 1993, p99-102, bibl Periodical Website
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