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8 results for Bluefin tuna
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Record #:
2644
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Giant bluefin tuna weighing over 300 pounds have been wintering off Cape Hatteras since 1993. Their appearance has attracted not only sportsfishermen, but also wildlife officials who are trying to explain their arrival.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Nov/Dec 1995, p18-19, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4120
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fishing for Bluefin tuna, which can weigh up to 600 pounds, is growing in popularity. One fish can sell for over $50,000, and in 1997, anglers spent over $3.6 million in Hatteras on such items as accommodations, food, and fishing supplies. Since 1996, anglers and researchers have participated in a Tag-a-Giant Bluefin Project. The tuna is caught, tagged with an archival tag, and released. The tag transmits data to a satellite about movement, diving activity, depth, light, and external temperatures.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 1999, p24-26, il Periodical Website
Record #:
7519
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fishing for bluefin tuna, which can weigh up to 1,000 pounds and measure ten feet in length, is growing in popularity. Strong annual runs of bluefin make it a popular sport in the winter months off Morehead City and Cape Hatteras. The bluefin is also the subject of one of the largest research projects ever conducted on a single species of fish, the Tag-A-Giant program. The tuna is caught, tagged with an archival tag, and released. The tag transmits data to a satellite about movement, diving activity, depth, light, and external temperatures.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 7, Dec 2005, p34-36, 38, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
11962
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since 1993, giant bluefin tuna weighing over 300 pounds have been wintering off Cape Hatteras from November to April. They are fast swimmers and are not picky eaters. Scientists are studying them to learn their movements, their habitats, and how many are left.
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Record #:
3214
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tag-A-Giant, the N.C. Giant Bluefin Tuna Conservation Series, is a combined research effort of scientists and anglers to tag one hundred bluefins caught off Cape Hatteras in 1997. Scientists hope to recover five to ten percent of the archival tags.
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Record #:
27668
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Bluefin Tuna is an extraordinary fish that is among the world’s most endangered species. This article discusses the Bluefin’s way of life, its habitat, and migration patterns.
Record #:
28328
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) typically range in oceanic waters along the entire Eastern Atlantic coast and in the northern Gulf of Mexico. However, there have been several reports of bluefin tuna in shallow depths of estuarine waters. Bluefin tuna were observed in Archers Creek located at the end of Bogue Banks, North Carolina.
Record #:
30087
Abstract:
Two species of Thunnus, the yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) and the blackfin tuna (Thunnus atlanticus), are highly esteemed food and sport fish found in the Southern Atlantic Ocean. To obtain more data pertinent to the management of these fish, a study examined the stomach content of fishes collected at Oregon Inlet, Hatteras, North Carolina between 19809 and 1982.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 9, June 1983, p33-52, bibl Periodical Website
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