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18 results for Morris, Bill
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Record #:
6412
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Morris recounts the baseball career of Artis Plummer, who played on teams that barnstormed across the South and south of the border fifty years ago. Barnstorming was a way for players to earn money during the off-season. After his baseball career, Plummer opened a sign painting business, Art Signs, a community institution in Durham for fifty years.
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Record #:
6883
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Morris visited seven of North Carolina's tiniest towns. He describes each one and discusses why these small places appeal to people. Each of the towns is listed in the U.S. census of 2000 as an incorporated municipality with a population under 300. The towns are Gatesville (pop. 281); Seven Springs (pop. 86); Macon (pop. 115); Seagrove (pop. 274); Danbury (pop. 108); Hayesville (pop. 297); and Seven Devils (pop. 130).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 6, Nov 2004, p92-98, 100-102, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7114
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Beaufort artist Robert Irwin discusses his life and work with Morris. In the 1970s, he studied under George Bireline at the North Carolina State University School of Design. In the 1980s, he founded Images, Inc., a design and fabrication company that made high-end custom furniture. He later sold the company and moved to Beaufort in 1991, where he lives and paints.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 10, Mar 2005, p144-146, 148, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7324
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The Fort Bragg Cultural Resources Program unearths, catalogs, and preserves the rich historical resources that are located on the fort's 160,000 acres. The program manages prehistoric archaeological sites, historic landscapes, artifacts, and documents. The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 requires all federal installations to make this preservation effort. The program has identified over 3,900 archaeological sites, 374 historic buildings, 27 historic cemeteries, and a Civil War battlefield.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Aug 2005, p108-110, 112, 114-115, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7474
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Heritage tourism is “travel that is motivated by a desire to experience the authentic natural, historic, and cultural resources of a community or region,” and it is one of the fastest growing segments in the state's tourism industry. Morris discusses areas in the state from the mountains to the coast that attract tourists interested in cultural tourism, eco-tourism, agri-tourism, and the Civil War.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 6, Nov 2005, p186-188, 190, 193-193, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7519
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Fishing for bluefin tuna, which can weigh up to 1,000 pounds and measure ten feet in length, is growing in popularity. Strong annual runs of bluefin make it a popular sport in the winter months off Morehead City and Cape Hatteras. The bluefin is also the subject of one of the largest research projects ever conducted on a single species of fish, the Tag-A-Giant program. The tuna is caught, tagged with an archival tag, and released. The tag transmits data to a satellite about movement, diving activity, depth, light, and external temperatures.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 7, Dec 2005, p34-36, 38, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7681
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Plymouth, established in 1787, is the county seat of Washington County. At one time the state's second-busiest port, the town had its own light station. A replica of the lighthouse stands near the Civil War museum. The town was prosperous up to the Civil War, but the conflict left it in ruins with only eleven buildings standing. The town has undergone several economic cycles, and at one time twenty-nine buildings on the main street were empty. Now twenty-seven of them have been purchased for development. Things to see in Plymouth include the Port O' Plymouth Museum, a replica of the Civil War ironclad Albemarle, the Roanoke River Lighthouse and Maritime Museum, God's Creation Wildlife Museum, and The Garden Spot restaurant.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 10, Mar 2006, p18-20, 22-23, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
7771
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Mickey Walsh held the first Stoneybrook Steeplechase at his Southern Pine's farm in 1947. April 8, 2006, will mark the fifty-fifth running of the race, which attracts around 15,000 spectators and dozens of participants. The event was thought to be over in 1996, when the Walsh farm, the first and only home of the event, was sold for development. The race was revived a few years later at the Carolina Horse Park, located near Raeford in Hoke County. The race has been run there for the past six years. Morris discusses the history and pageantry of one of the Carolinas' largest horse-racing events.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 11, Apr 2006, p108-110, 112-113, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7901
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In 1990, twenty-five public fishing piers, approximately one-fourth of all the fishing piers on the Atlantic Coast, jutted out from the state's coastline from Kitty Hawk to Sunset Beach. Kure Beach Pier, which open in 1923, was the first, and it has remained in the Kure family's possession for the past eighty-three years. By May 1, 2006, ten of the twenty-five had closed forever. Hurricanes caused the loss of some piers, but accelerated development on the barrier islands, especially Bogue Banks, is the main reason for closing piers. The price of beachfront property is soaring, and pier owners are selling to the developers. Soon the state's fishing piers and the culture they engendered will be gone forever.
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Record #:
7993
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Morris describes five North Carolina farms where conventional crops were traded for alternatives uses of acreage. They are Spinning Spider Creamery, producing goat cheese in Marshall; Whistlepig Farm, growing specialty garlic in Asheville; Chapel Hill Creamery, producing cheese from grass-fed cows in Chapel Hill; Harbinger Lavender Farm, growing varieties of lavender in Harbinger; and Bradsher Sod Farm, growing fescue in Raleigh.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p136-138, 140, 142, 144, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8249
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Roy Armstrong II came to Beaufort Community College in 1981 to teach English and to launch an oral history project. Students talked to people whose memories stretched back into an earlier time in coastal North Carolina and transcribed them. The result was a journal called LIFE ON THE PAMLICO. Thirty-eight issues have been published, each containing three or four oral histories illustrated with black-and-white photographs. The oral histories are available on the college website at CircaNCeast.beaufortccc.edu.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p136-138, 140, 142, 144, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8875
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Many smaller towns along North Carolina's coast are falling victim to spreading development and increasing tax rates. With commercial fishing declining and a high market value on property, many working-class people choose to sell in hopes of getting some financial security. When this happens, the old traditions that have existed in towns for over one hundred years slowly slip away. Salter Path in Carteret County is one example. The town is poised on the edge of exploding prices, modern development, and inevitable irreversible change. Morris discusses the work of Fielding Darden, who produced a CD and book in 2006, titled WILL THIS TOWN SURVIVE, and his activities to preserve the town's history.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007, p156-160, 162, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9568
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At one time there were 329 plantation estates reaching across rural North Carolina. Only a few, including China Grove Plantation in Arapahoe and Green River Plantation in Rutherfordton, would be preserved.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 3, Aug 2007, p70-74, 76, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
16276
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Katherine Fulton is the editor of the Durham-based Independent, an alternative press. While many of these newspapers which emerged from the 1960s rebellion against the establishment have become more interested in making many than in making waves, the Independent has not. What sets it apart is that \"it has a spine of steel, solid investigative pieces, witty, incisive coverage of politics and state government, and relishes pointing out when the emperor isn't wearing any clothes.\"
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 9 Issue 10, Oct 1989, p54-56, 59-60, 62, 64, 66, por Periodical Website
Record #:
16642
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When it comes to producing novelists and journalists, North Carolina has always treasured its own. But you would walk for many miles in the august hallways of our great universities before you would hear anyone mention the name of the man who, for 20 years between 1945 and 1965, was the best-known writer the state -- and UNC -- had ever produced: Robert Chester Ruark. Ruark was born in Wilmington in 1915 and graduated from UNC-Chapel Hill in 1935. He became famous first as a newspaperman, then as a feature writer for slick magazines and finally as a best-selling novelist.
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