NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


35 results for Historic buildings--Conservation and restoration
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
16
Author(s):
Abstract:
Efforts are underway to restore several historic Civil War-era structures, including Fort Fisher, Fort Macon, the Fayetteville Arsenal, the Seaboard Building in Raleigh, and the Bellamy Mansion in Wilmington.
Source:
Record #:
180
Author(s):
Abstract:
Restoring an historic home can be time consuming and costly, yet indescribably rewarding. The Historic Preservation Foundation of North Carolina is in this business.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 11, Apr 1992, p30-33, il
Full Text:
Record #:
486
Abstract:
Tarboro used an imaginative combination of downtown revitalization and historic preservation to create new opportunities for economic growth and development.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 16 Issue 2, Fall 1990, p50-54, il, bibl, f
Full Text:
Record #:
492
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stipe discusses the changes that have occurred in the preservation field over the last forty years, takes a critical look at the role of the federal government, and advocates more control on the local level.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 15 Issue 1, Spring 1989, p25-35, il
Full Text:
Record #:
491
Abstract:
The combined efforts and joint sponsorship of art groups and preservationists in North Carolina have yielded spectacular results.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 15 Issue 1, Spring 1989, p22-24, il
Full Text:
Record #:
1766
Abstract:
The railroad in North Carolina brought progress and prosperity to communities along its route. The 1991 Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act contains provisions allocating money for the preservation and rehabilitation of historic rail depots
Source:
Record #:
2183
Abstract:
Begun in 1980 as a project for the National Trust for Historic Preservation the North Carolina Main Street program has assisted cities like Tarboro, Mocksville, and Waynesville in revitalizing and preserving their central business districts.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 45 Issue 3, Mar 1995, p1, 8-9, il
Record #:
3645
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1997 General Assembly enacted new state tax credit laws to make rehabilitating historic buildings and residences more attractive. The goal is not to preserve them as museums but to preserve them for continued use.
Source:
Record #:
4487
Author(s):
Abstract:
Gutted by fire in 1985, the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church in Charlotte has risen from the ashes in a new guise - the Tryon Center for Visual Art. Restored through a $7 million grant from Bank of America, the center provides three-month grants and work space to national and international artists. It is also a place where young and old can take classes, artists can exhibit, and local artists can lease space for a small fee.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4658
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since 1998, North Carolina has offered a 20 percent tax credit to individuals and companies that rehabilitate income producing historic structures. The state is one of seventeen states that offer this incentive. The program has also produced an increase in the number of nominations to the National Register of Historic Places. Among neighborhoods benefiting from this incentive are Glenwood South, Raleigh, and Delworth, Charlotte.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 116, Summer 2000, p3-4, il
Record #:
4811
Abstract:
The Balsam Mountain Inn, a resort hotel at Balsam; the Richmond Hill Inn, a grand Victorian mansion in Asheville; the Holly Inn, a Pinehurst retreat; and the First Colony Inn, a coastal inn at Nags Head, all treasured landmarks, have been restored and returned to their former glories.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 6, Nov 2000, p156-162, 164-165, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
7800
Abstract:
Innovative projects are bringing historic mill buildings back to life all across North Carolina. No longer eyesores, renovated mills have become desirable features in the economic and social fabric of their communities. Renovated buildings become sites for restaurants, stores, and condominiums. Among topics discussed are the costs of renovation, quality of original construction, impact on the neighborhood, and local participation.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 129, Spring 2006, p10-11, il
Record #:
8241
Author(s):
Abstract:
In June 2006, the North Carolina General Assembly created a new tax incentive for the adaptive use of vacant historic agricultural, manufacturing, and utility buildings. The law provides enhanced tax credits for the historic rehabilitation of buildings that have been substantially vacant for at least two years. The rehabilitation costs must exceed $3 million.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 130, Fall 2006, p3, il
Record #:
9486
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Greek Revival plantation house on Poplar Neck Plantation near Edenton dates to 1853. Simon and Nancy Rich purchased the 300-acre property in 1975. Lea discusses the renovation of the house and the old derelict Edenton Peanut Mill, which was built in 1909.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
9555
Author(s):
Abstract:
A number of North Carolina cities are redeveloping proud symbols of their past. These include Goldsboro's downtown Union Station and Durham's minor league baseball field, the Durham Athletic Park, former home of the Durham Bulls.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 57 Issue 9, Sept 2007, p1, 10-11, il