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4 results for Fishes--Research
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Record #:
4120
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fishing for Bluefin tuna, which can weigh up to 600 pounds, is growing in popularity. One fish can sell for over $50,000, and in 1997, anglers spent over $3.6 million in Hatteras on such items as accommodations, food, and fishing supplies. Since 1996, anglers and researchers have participated in a Tag-a-Giant Bluefin Project. The tuna is caught, tagged with an archival tag, and released. The tag transmits data to a satellite about movement, diving activity, depth, light, and external temperatures.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 1999, p24-26, il Periodical Website
Record #:
7519
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fishing for bluefin tuna, which can weigh up to 1,000 pounds and measure ten feet in length, is growing in popularity. Strong annual runs of bluefin make it a popular sport in the winter months off Morehead City and Cape Hatteras. The bluefin is also the subject of one of the largest research projects ever conducted on a single species of fish, the Tag-A-Giant program. The tuna is caught, tagged with an archival tag, and released. The tag transmits data to a satellite about movement, diving activity, depth, light, and external temperatures.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 7, Dec 2005, p34-36, 38, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
6741
Author(s):
Abstract:
The speckled trout, North Carolina's only native mountain trout, is now recognized by scientists as the Southern Appalachian strain of brook trout. The current distribution of this trout is greatly reduced from the period of the state's early settlers. Because of this, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission has started a project to locate and identify all the speckled brook trout that remain in the state. DNA testing helps scientists differentiate between the native speckled trout and non-natives.
Full Text:
Record #:
28167
Author(s):
Abstract:
A large bulleye, Cookeolus japonicas (Family Priacanthidae), was caught March 2, 2001, by a commercial hook-and-line fisherman, southwest of Beaufort Inlet, North Carolina. This new North Carolina specimen is the largest in North Carolina and the second largest reported in the Northwest Atlantic.