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18 results for Waterfowl conservation
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Record #:
4582
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The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission's 1999 waterfowl stamp and print is titled \"Green-Winged Teal at Pisgah Covered Bridge\" and was painted by North Carolina artist Robert C. Flowers. The Randolph County bridge, built in 1910, is one of only two covered bridges left in the state. Since its inception in 1983, the North Carolina Wildlife Heritage series of stamps and prints has raised over $3 million for waterfowl conservation.
Record #:
9724
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Jay Norwood “Ding” Darling is remembered today as one of this country's great conservationists. He was instrumental in founding the National Wildlife Federation, established the national wildlife refuge system, and made the federal “duck stamp” a reality. He was also an accomplished political cartoonist. Taylor discusses some of his biting cartoons and their influence on conservation.
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Record #:
24597
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One of the country’s most valuable waterfowl preserves on Lake Mattamuskeet was started by J. A. (Lon) Bolich, Jr. in 1933. The author discusses how the preserve was founded.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 32 Issue 22, April 1965, p13-14, il, por
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Record #:
26081
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On the Holly Shelter Game Land in Pender County, North Carolina has added a new 200 acre waterfowl impoundment. Vegetation has been added and the area will be flooded with water from nearby creeks to make it attractive for ducks.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 21 Issue 2, Mar-Apr 1977, p19
Record #:
26317
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The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission has begun construction of a waterfowl impoundment on the Gull Rock Game Lands near New Holland.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Spring 1978, p11
Record #:
26631
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Waterfowl resources are facing threats of wetland habitat loss, lead shot poisoning, and overharvesting. In response, North Carolina hunters are cutting back on Canadian goose harvest and encouraging personal commitment towards wetlands conservation.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 34 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1987, p8-9, il
Record #:
2928
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The theme for the 1996 state waterfowl stamps and art print is \"North Carolina's Wildlife Heritage\", featuring such sites as Lake Mattamuskeet. Since its inception in 1983, the program has raised over $3 million for waterfowl conservation.
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Record #:
3785
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The 1998 state waterfowl stamps and print feature Canadian geese and the historic Currituck Shooting Club in Corolla. Money from sales supports the North Carolina Wildlife Commission's Waterfowl Fund.
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Record #:
4878
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The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission's 2001 waterfowl stamp and print is titled \"Canvasbacks at the Whalehead Club.\" Money from sales supports the North Carolina Wildlife Commission's Waterfowl Fund. Since its inception in 1983, over $3 million has been raised.
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Record #:
6738
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The 2004 North Carolina Wildlife Commission's waterfowl stamp and art print is Gerald Putt's painting of mallards on the Butner-Falls of Neuse Game Land. Proceeds from sales of stamps and prints augment the commission's waterfowl fund. Since its inception in 1983, the program has raised over $4.2 million for waterfowl conservation.
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Record #:
9635
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Bolen discusses the life and activities of political cartoonist and conservationist Jay N. “Ding” Darling. Although his cartoons were critical of the New Deal, President Roosevelt appointed him head of the Bureau of Biological Survey, the forerunner of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It was Darling's promotion in 1934 of the Migratory Bird Hunting Stamp that secured his legacy. The first stamp sold for $1 and raised $635,000 for conservation efforts. Since then this stamp program has generated over $700 million for conservation.
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Record #:
21089
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In August 2013, the NC Wildlife Resources Commission received an award from the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Southeast Region, for outstanding work in waterfowl conservation and management in the Southeast.
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Record #:
26769
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A painting of a drake and hen mallard by well-known wildlife artist Richard Plasschaert has been selected as the design for North Carolina’s first waterfowl stamp. Proceeds from the stamp program go to waterfowl conservation.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 30 Issue 3, May/June 1983, p3, il
Record #:
29622
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Sylvan Heights Bird Park is about an hour north of Greenville near the small town of Scotland Neck, North Carolina. The park features more than two-thousand waterfowl and exotic birds that live in a natural habitat. The park is also known for its breeding facility to save endangered waterfowl.
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Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Fall 2017, p8-12, il, por
Record #:
30748
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Sylvan Heights Waterfowl Park & Eco-Center in Scotland Neck, Halifax County has more than two-hundred species of birds, and the world’s largest collection of waterfowl. Internationally famous aviculturist Mike Lubbock and his wife Ali raise and sustain the waterfowl at the park’s breeding center. Sylvan Heights is also recognized for its educational program and conservation efforts.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 42 Issue 7, July 2010, p20, il, por Periodical Website
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