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55 results for North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission
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Record #:
438
Author(s):
Abstract:
Holmes discusses the roles and responsibilities of the North Carolina Wildlife Commission.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 40 Issue 3, May/June 1992, p4-6, il
Record #:
734
Author(s):
Abstract:
Biennial report describes the duties and activities of the divisions within the North Carolina Wildlife Commission.
Record #:
1985
Author(s):
Abstract:
After adopting both a definition of \"critical habitat\"\" and the procedures for designating one, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission established a process by which state agencies can cooperate to save endangered wildlife.
Record #:
9831
Author(s):
Abstract:
This special edition of WILDLIFE IN NORTH CAROLINA contains the biennial divisional reports of the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission for the period from July 1, 1984 - June 30, 1986. The reporting divisions are the office of the director, administrative services, boating and inland fisheries, enforcement, wildlife management, and conservation education.
Record #:
23294
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission functions as wildlife protectors and wildlife law enforcers.
Record #:
25924
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission recently surprise voted to remove Executive Director Clyde P. Patton from his position followed a controversial political power play. Newspapers across North Carolina react to the news of this removal, which was personally appealed by the Governor-Elect.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 16 Issue 1, 1973, p14-24
Record #:
25926
Author(s):
Abstract:
A two part program by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission is undeway to improve the striped bass population in the Tarheel waters by stocking fingerling fish.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 16 Issue 2, Spring 1973, p6
Record #:
25947
Author(s):
Abstract:
Secretary of the Department of Natural and Economic Resources (NER), James E. Harrington, Jr., laid to rest rumors that the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission faces major changes as it is reorganized into NER. The NCWRC will retain its autonomy while also gaining the added financial resources of the NER.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 17 Issue 1, 1974, p3
Record #:
25954
Author(s):
Abstract:
In response to questions about what the NC Wildlife Resources Commission actually does, Dean provides an editorial showing some of the projects being carried out by the Commission. These include studying different strains of bass in order to improve bass fishing in the state; the establishment of silt controls for road builders which prevents loss of streams and rivers; the provision of seeds that can be planted for game populations; and hunting and boating safety programs.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 18 Issue 3, Summer 1974, p2, 6
Record #:
26056
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission is opposing the flooding of the newly completed New Hope Reservoir, located in Chatham County until acceptable water quality can be guaranteed by managers.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 20 Issue 5, Nov-Dec 1976, p18
Record #:
26347
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission accepted a 965 acre tract of land from the Union Camp Corporation. In Gate County, the land will become part of the Commission’s game lands program.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 22 Issue 3, Summer 1978, p22
Record #:
26361
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission is facing financial problems. As the agency relies exclusively on funds generated from fishing, trapping, boating, and hunting, they are unable to rely on the state for more aid. Potential remedies for this include additional tags, license fees, and increased paid interest.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 22 Issue 4, Fall 1978, p27
Record #:
26455
Author(s):
Abstract:
When people experience wildlife problems in or around their homes, they have several options. To trap animals themselves, they need a permit from the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission. Otherwise, they can contact a pest control operator or wildlife damage control specialist to solve the problem.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 39 Issue 40(1), Jan/Feb 1992, p13-14
Record #:
26461
Author(s):
Abstract:
The N.C. Wildlife Federation was formed in 1947 to help create the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, a state wildlife agency that ran on sound science, not politics. As society changes, questions about a new role for the Commission are being raised. Today the Commission must balance its resources to provide protection for game and nongame species of plants and animals.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 39 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1992, p3-5, il, por
Record #:
26519
Abstract:
Ellenbogen discusses the issues that face the policy-making arm of the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission in the wake of the firing of Executive Director Robert Hazel in January 1980.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 10, Oct 1980, p5, 8-9, bibl