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10 results for Pollutants
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Record #:
2422
Author(s):
Abstract:
Nutrients from industry and farms are deluging the coastal ecosystem, producing problems like algal blooms and fish kills. N.C. Sea Grant researchers are using tools like hydrocorals and satellites to chart a course of treatment.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , July/Aug 1995, p10-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
25497
Author(s):
Abstract:
Steve Wing is an associate professor of epidemiology at UNC. Since 1995, Wing has been studying hog farming communities, waste management and its environmental effects. An important focus of his research is the proximity of hog waste lagoons to drinking water and residential areas. His research suggests that hog farming is linked to pollution and local health issues.
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Record #:
25896
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Abstract:
Richard Weisler, an adjunct professor of psychiatry, mapped the locations of cancer deaths and suicides and found they were within proximity to asphalt plants in Salisbury, North Carolina. Hydrogen sulfide, a chemical emitted from asphalt plants, is suspected to affect mood and responses to stress.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Winter 2006, p21-24, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26017
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Abstract:
Coral reefs are threatened by global warming and overfishing in the Caribbean. John Bruno, assistant professor of marine sciences, found that nutrients from chemical fertilizers accelerate coral disease.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 20 Issue 3, Spring 2004, p6-8, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26827
Author(s):
Abstract:
The nation’s drinking water supply is threatened by chemical contamination from industrial wastes that seep into the waterways. At certain concentrations, contaminants can cause nausea, dizziness, tremors, blindness, and potentially cancer. The Mississippi and Ohio Rivers are among the most polluted waterways.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 7, July 1981, p7
Subject(s):
Record #:
27519
Author(s):
Abstract:
Experts say the Triangle’s drinking water is “probably” safe, but carcinogens have been detected in quantities slightly larger than considered safe. The area treatment systems are not equipped to handle this problem. Most of the area’s rivers, lakes, and reservoirs are considered unfit for swimming and drinking. The scope of the Triangle’s water pollution and solutions are examined in Part 1 of a three part series.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 9, April 27-May 3 1989, p9-10, 14-16, map Periodical Website
Record #:
27521
Author(s):
Abstract:
This is Part 2 of a 3-part series on water pollution in the Triangle area. The sources of the Triangle’s water pollution are examined. The majority of pollution is from toxins that run off of city streets caused by citizens. Farmers account for 17 percent of the problem and industry and faulty sewage treatment facilities account for 16 percent. The governments role in regulation and what can be done is also examined.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 10, May 4-10 1989, p7-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
27523
Author(s):
Abstract:
Part 3 of a three part series on the water pollution in the Triangle focuses on how the area and residents can fix the problem. The Triangle area has some of the sickest rivers and lakes in the state. Seven solutions are presented. Better regulations, technology upgrades, limiting growth, and citizen action through recycling and conservation are the just some of the simple solutions put forth.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 11, May 11-18 1989, p8-10 Periodical Website
Record #:
12024
Author(s):
Abstract:
Khanna discusses water and ground contamination in Durham caused by chemicals used in dry cleaning establishments. Cleanups are costly and funds for this purpose come from the state Dry Cleaning Solvent Cleanup Act. "There could be as many as 1,500 current and former dry cleaners in the state where perc is leaching into the soil, groundwater, and air inside people's homes and businesses."
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 3, Jan 2010, p5, 7, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
34273
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Dry-Cleaning Solvent Cleanup Program was developed in 1997 by the Superfund Section of the North Carolina Division of Waste Management to clean up sites contaminated with dry-cleaning solvents. The major contaminant at dry cleaning sites is perchloroethylene, a highly volatile hydrocarbon that can damage the central nervous system and liver functions. The Division is developing rules to certify sites that are eligible for cleanup under the program, and assessing the number of active dry-cleaning facilities in the state.