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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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20 results for Water-supply
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Record #:
71
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The Environmental Management Commission voted to grant Piedmont Triad Regional Water Authority the eminent domain and water transfer authorities it needs to proceed with the 48-million-gallons-per-day Randleman Lake regional water supply project.
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72
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The first phase of research on the economic implications of the proposed water supply watershed protection regulations is underway.
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Record #:
328
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As the population grows, water supply needs increase as do the sources of pollution. The challenge of protecting water quality and ensuring an adequate water supply must be accepted and acted upon by the state.
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Record #:
518
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Interbasin transfers, or diversions, have had a way of raising the hackles of legislators, officials, and citizens. The author attempts to clarify relevant transfer laws in an effort to reduce misunderstanding and confrontation.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 55 Issue 2, Fall 1989, p34-44
Record #:
771
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North Carolina's Water Supply Watershed Classification and Protection Act was passed to protect county and municipality water supplies from increasing pollution and degradation.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 18 Issue 1, Aug 1992, p17-21, bibl, f
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Record #:
4049
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Believing it is better to spend a little money now than a great deal later, the General Assembly created the Clean Water Trust Management Fund in 1996. It is independently run and funded yearly; it grants monies to local governments and nonprofit conservation groups that seek to protect the state's water resources. To date, $92.5 million has been given out. A list of projects funded is included.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 2, Feb 1999, p20-26, il
Record #:
4850
Author(s):
Abstract:
A good water supply is important to the growth and well-being of North Carolina. In a fifteen county area in the central coastal plain, which includes the fast-growing counties of Pitt, Lenoir, Craven and Onslow, the water supply is becoming critical. Smith describes ways a number of communities are dealing with the water supply issue and what plans the state has.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2000, p21-22, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
5485
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North Carolina's population is rising and so is the demand for water. Some areas are maxing out their water supplies, while the state copes with a continuing drought. Deen examines a number of state communities to learn how they are dealing with this declining resource.
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Record #:
7448
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Water and sewer revenues keep the state's utilities in business by covering the costs of daily expenses and providing funds for long-term system planning. Hughes examines fundamental principles behind water and sewer revenues and looks at high-priority decisions that water and sewer boards face. For example, in 2002, the approximately 500 government-owned water and sewer enterprises collected from their customers over $1.4 billion. Combined company assets were about $7.8 billion. However, over the next twenty years North Carolina will need over $11 billion in investments to meets infrastructure needs for water and sewer.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 70 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 2005, p4-14, il, map, f
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Record #:
8181
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The summer of 2005 will mark the tenth anniversary of massive algae blooms and fish kills on the lower Neuse River caused by excessive nitrogen and phosphate loading in the Neuse estuary. Bill Holman, executive director of the North Carolina Clean Water Management Trust Fund, feels this was one instance where policymakers and scientists were at odds. He cites two examples of proactive, progressive management of water quality in the state's rapidly growing and highly urbanized Piedmont region--the Mountain Island Lake initiative and the Catawba River Mountain Island Lake. The latter contains the largest drinking water supply in North Carolina.
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Record #:
25247
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The Pamlico-Tar River Foundation provides an update on water-supply discussions that will affect several counties.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 20 Issue 3, Summer 2001, p6
Record #:
26148
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Chapel Hill and Carrboro can use nine million gallons of water a day. Pumping that much water is a big and expensive job. Using dynamic programming, graduate student Amy Buege figured out an efficient water pumping schedule that maintains water quality standards.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 14 Issue 1, Fall 1997, p24-25, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26362
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North Carolina and Virginia are in a court battle over the use of Lake Gaston as a water supply source for southeastern Virginia.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 22 Issue 4, Fall 1978, p32
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Record #:
26666
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After this year’s drought, most North Carolina farmers don’t need to be reminded how precious water is, but to the rest of us, it may not be so obvious. There is no substitute for clean water and we must practice wise use of this essential natural resource.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 33 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1986, p11, il
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Record #:
425
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The zebra mussel from Europe is poised to threaten water supplies throughout the United States, including the waters of North Carolina.
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