NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


8 results for Water--Pollution--Research
Currently viewing results 1 - 8
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
2422
Author(s):
Abstract:
Nutrients from industry and farms are deluging the coastal ecosystem, producing problems like algal blooms and fish kills. N.C. Sea Grant researchers are using tools like hydrocorals and satellites to chart a course of treatment.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , July/Aug 1995, p10-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
32206
Author(s):
Abstract:
In June 2017, an industrial chemical called GenX was identified in drinking water drawn from the Cape Fear River in the Wilmington area of North Carolina. State officials have found GenX in private wells near the plant, as well as at several other locations, at varying concentrations. With increasing public concern, researchers are studying the effects of the chemical on human health.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2018, p24-29, il, por, map Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
33301
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Water Resources Research Institute will support research in four areas under the institute’s Federal Cooperative Program for Fiscal Year 1986. The four projects will examine radon in water, groundwater availability in the Piedmont Saprolite, use of swamp systems for treatment of municipal wastewater, and water quality and fish diseases.
Record #:
33300
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Department of Human Resources’ Solid and Hazardous Waste Management Branch published a report on managing contaminated ground water in 1984. The report includes case studies of companies that have changed the way they handle their hazardous wastes, and discusses the existence of groundwater in the five hydrogeologic regions of North Carolina.
Record #:
33299
Author(s):
Abstract:
A survey of state regulatory agencies was conducted in 1983 by the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering. The survey showed a trend toward increased use of seasonal discharge standards by state water pollution control agencies, and that they planned to use some degree of flexibility in standards for municipal and industrial discharges.
Record #:
34197
Author(s):
Abstract:
A recent report published by the North Carolina Division of Environmental Management says that the 1987 phosphate detergent ban has achieved an average forty-eight-percent reduction in wastewater treatment plant effluent phosphorus concentrations. These results are based on twenty-three wastewater treatment plants across the state. The ban is preventing phosphorus from being discharged into the rivers of the state.
Record #:
34169
Author(s):
Abstract:
A Water Resource Research Institute project initiated in 1987 and aimed at determining the effectiveness of vegetative buffers in removing sediment and nutrients from agricultural drainage has been extended and expanded under a cooperative funding agreement among several agencies and university scientists. The results of the study should allow more accurate prediction of how vegetative buggers can aid in solving agricultural nonpoint source pollution problems.
Record #:
34221
Author(s):
Abstract:
At an April workshop sponsored by the Cooperative Extension Service, scientists from across the state discussed projects aimed at determining the extent of pesticide contamination of North Carolina’s ground and surface waters and the ecological effects of pesticide contamination. Much of the discussion pertained to public perception of risks from pesticide exposure, and the implications of the projects.