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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for Leibach, Julie
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Record #:
32206
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In June 2017, an industrial chemical called GenX was identified in drinking water drawn from the Cape Fear River in the Wilmington area of North Carolina. State officials have found GenX in private wells near the plant, as well as at several other locations, at varying concentrations. With increasing public concern, researchers are studying the effects of the chemical on human health.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2018, p24-29, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
34720
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The community of Nags Head on the Outer Banks of North Carolina has responded to climate change and sea level rise with the help of community collaboration. The goals included realizing what their vulnerabilities were, how to address these issues, and adapting as necessary as things change.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 3, Summer 2018, p8-12, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
34796
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The wreck of the Agnes E. Fry was located near the Cape Fear River mouth in 2016. Archaeologists experience almost zero visibility underwater in order to confirm the identity of the Civil War-era blockade runner. Three artifacts have since been pulled up and a 3D model is planned for the future.
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Record #:
34799
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Beachcombing has long been a favorite coast activity in North Carolina. During the Sea Grant Mid-Atlantic Regional Meeting, a beach scavenger hunt was held. Several fish species, seahorses, and eels were all found along the Corolla shore.
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Record #:
40007
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Helping individuals improve garden quality at all stages is Coastal Landscapes Initiative. Encouraging nature-friendly landscaping practices, CLI’s booklet includes information about native plants adaptable and appealing. The thirty-four species included Eastern Red Cedar, Coral Honeysuckle, and Spotted Horsemint.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Fall 2019, p32-37 Periodical Website
Record #:
40562
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A hurricane’s impact can last long after it has gone back out into the sea and water levels in rivers have returned to normal. Proof perhaps more compelling than words is this collection of photographs. They reveal the havoc Hurricane Florence wreaked on inland communities such as Trenton and counties such as Harnett, as well as islands such as Bald.
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Record #:
40563
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A Category 1 hurricane by the time it made landfall, Florence wreaked water-related havoc as it crawled through Coastal and Eastern North Carolina. At speeds as slow as 2mph, Florence created 1,000-year rain events in towns such as Mount Olive, dumped nearly three feet of rain in Elizabethtown, and generated a surge exceeding seven feet in Jacksonville.
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