NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


12 results for Flooding
Currently viewing results 1 - 12
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
16920
Author(s):
Abstract:
Torrential rainfall from hurricanes Dennis and Floyd produced the great flood of 1999 for North Carolina. Many accounts touted the event as \"the flood of the century\" and reported the probability of experiencing such an event as one in 400 or 500 years. Although the magnitude of the flood is unquestionable, to assign such a definition to the flood provides an opportunity to reexamine flood frequency analysis and the accuracy of recurrence interval estimates.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 8 Issue , 2000, p29-40, map, bibl, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
16998
Author(s):
Abstract:
Digital elevation models have been developed as a tool for flood extent mapping of floodplains. These maps provide information on the extent of areas potentially devastated by floods, and can be used as a tool to assess social and economic impacts of such natural hazards.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 15 Issue , 2007, p1-19, bibl, f
Record #:
25922
Author(s):
Abstract:
Despite the appropriation of funds, TVA announced it will discontinue plans to plans to build a system of 14 dams and reservoirs along the Upper French Broad River basin in Western North Carolina. Although TVA believed the plans’ aims to provide local economic benefits would be successful in the long term, the communities of the affected counties were no longer supportive at all levels.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 16 Issue 1, 1973, p9
Record #:
26318
Author(s):
Abstract:
Massive flooding in western North Carolina damaged trout streams in 16 counties; however, continuing efforts at flood control may also pose a threat to the trout populations by destroying the habitat.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Spring 1978, p11, 30
Subject(s):
Record #:
27628
Abstract:
Hurricane Matthew’s outer bands hit Eastern North Carolina on October 8th, but the damage from that storm will take months and even years to recover from. The Cape Fear, Lumber, Neuse, and Tar Rivers saw record-breaking flood levels and coastal communities experienced immense storm surges. Many people were displaced, but fortunately FEMA funds will assist with the efforts to find homes for those affected.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2016, p18-23, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
29672
Author(s):
Abstract:
One year after Hurricane Matthew flooded the small town of Lumberton, North Carolina, some people are still without homes. Many people were unaware of the rising floodwater that followed the hurricane, until it was too late. Lumberton residents describe their experiences and how they have been coping with the flood impacts.
Source:
Record #:
30930
Author(s):
Abstract:
Author Jay Barnes revisits hurricane Fran twenty years later. This article is composed of excerpts from Barne's 2013 book, NORTH CAROLINA'S HURICANE HISTORY. Hurricane Fran made landfall on September 5, 1996 at Bald Head Island as a category 3 hurricane.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 3, Summer 2016, p6-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
31291
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hurricane Dennis lashed the North Carolina coast during the week before Labor Day, cutting communication and transportation to and from Hatteras Island, causing power outages, and forcing many late-summer tourists to leave. High winds and flooding damaged power lines, and many coastal counties lost power for as long as two days.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 31 Issue 10, Oct 1999, p9, il
Record #:
34167
Author(s):
Abstract:
In a draft report prepared for the North Carolina Division of Water Resources, a Duke University Fellow says that unless local regulations are strengthened, residential areas with serious flooding problems will continue to be developed in floodplains of dam-controlled rivers in Piedmont North Carolina. This article discusses the study, regulations for development in floodplain areas, and flood insurance.
Record #:
36568
Author(s):
Abstract:
Familiar is how flooding from hurricanes affects Eastern North Carolina; Western North Carolina received relatively little attention. Illustrating the impact the flood of 1916, generated by two hurricanes that crossed this region, is the photo depicting Asheville’s experience. Also noted is the great amount of rainfall, among the heaviest recorded in United States history.
Record #:
40562
Author(s):
Abstract:
A hurricane’s impact can last long after it has gone back out into the sea and water levels in rivers have returned to normal. Proof perhaps more compelling than words is this collection of photographs. They reveal the havoc Hurricane Florence wreaked on inland communities such as Trenton and counties such as Harnett, as well as islands such as Bald.
Source:
Record #:
40563
Author(s):
Abstract:
A Category 1 hurricane by the time it made landfall, Florence wreaked water-related havoc as it crawled through Coastal and Eastern North Carolina. At speeds as slow as 2mph, Florence created 1,000-year rain events in towns such as Mount Olive, dumped nearly three feet of rain in Elizabethtown, and generated a surge exceeding seven feet in Jacksonville.
Source: