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5 results for Hurricanes--Carteret County
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Record #:
7913
Author(s):
Abstract:
A severe hurricane struck Carteret County with wind gusts in excess of 150 miles per hour on August 18, 1879. William B. Duncan wrote several letters to his son Thomas Isaac Duncan about the effects of the storm. The letters provide an eyewitness account of the storm's damage.
Source:
Record #:
7918
Author(s):
Abstract:
On September 15 and 16, 1933, a severe hurricane struck Carteret County with destructive winds and heavy rains. Beveridge recounts the effects of the storm, providing an eyewitness account of the storm's fury.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 21 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2005, p7-8
Record #:
34593
Author(s):
Abstract:
Brinson discusses the hurricane preparation his family, and others, undertook during his childhood. While flooding and power loss were guarantees, few residents left during a hurricane and chose instead to stock up on resources.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 12 Issue 1-4, 1996, p26-27
Record #:
34703
Author(s):
Abstract:
Diamond City, North Carolina, was once home to fifty families who were actively engaged with homesteading and fishing. Additional income was found when ships and their cargoes washed ashore; many materials were incorporated into house construction. While access to resources made life difficult, it was the 1899 hurricane which brought an end to the small community. The storm hit the coast and many families decided to return to the mainland. Some even brought their homes with them across the sound.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 20 Issue 1, Spring 2004, p18-19, il
Record #:
34699
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beaufort, North Carolina, was hit by a hurricane in September 1903. The fishing steamer BEATRICE was seining for menhaden offshore when the storm struck. Several other vessels which survived the gale began patrolling the seas looking for survivors and BEATRICE, but they had no luck. Ten days after the storm, the bow of BEATRICE washed ashore at Caffey’s Inlet, approximately 100 miles from the vessel’s last known location. The crew was never found.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 20 Issue 1, Spring 2004, p6-7