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4 results for Diamond City--History
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Record #:
9112
Author(s):
Abstract:
By 1700, ships from the New England Whaling Fleet took advantage of beached whales along North Carolina's coast, using the carcasses to make oil. By 1885, a town of over 500 people lived in Lookout Woods, later called Diamond City, chiefly to whale live specimens. Most of the whales killed were Right Whales, yielding an average of 200 barrels of oil each. Due to a decreased number of whales swimming off the coast, whaling in North Carolina ended around 1899.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 1, June 1976, p14-16, il
Full Text:
Record #:
19086
Abstract:
Like the legendary Atlantis, the defunct 19th-century community of Diamond City grips the imagination as it all but disappeared. Just east of Cape Lookout, Diamond City was once a substantial settlement with a maritime forest and fishing and whaling communities. However, a series of storms left the community worse for wear and little remains of the settlement today.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
6067
Author(s):
Abstract:
Diamond City, which had a population of several hundred people, once filled the land between Cape Lookout Lighthouse and the point of Core Banks Island. All that remains are a few family graveyards. Dean discusses the city and the whaling industry that flourished there for 150 years, ending in 1909.
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Full Text:
Record #:
34703
Author(s):
Abstract:
Diamond City, North Carolina, was once home to fifty families who were actively engaged with homesteading and fishing. Additional income was found when ships and their cargoes washed ashore; many materials were incorporated into house construction. While access to resources made life difficult, it was the 1899 hurricane which brought an end to the small community. The storm hit the coast and many families decided to return to the mainland. Some even brought their homes with them across the sound.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 20 Issue 1, Spring 2004, p18-19, il