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4 results for Shackleford Banks--History
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Record #:
19182
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Cape, Diamond City, Sam Windsor's Lump, Wade's Shore, Whale Creek, Mullet Pond, and Guthrie's Hammock--names of communities that ring with the sound of fiction. But these were once real villages along the shores of Shackleford Banks, whose earliest settlers were drawn to the area for whaling and fishing.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 11 Issue 2, Feb 1984, p6-8, il, f Periodical Website
Record #:
28678
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carolyn Mason was instrumental in protecting the wild Shackleford Banks horses. Mason helped lead and organize a campaign to protect the free range horses in 1995. The details of her campaign and its effect on the local horse population are detailed.
Source:
Record #:
36020
Abstract:
Described were three ways how the “oldest horse in North America” arrived on Outer Banks, all taking place during Elizabeth I’s reign. The population on Shackleford Banks and Currituck, low because of laws passed since the 1930s, could be considered valuable because of their demand. As for their value to the residents, called Bankers, that couldn’t be measured monetarily.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Fall/Winter 1982, p8-10
Record #:
37612
Author(s):
Abstract:
The celebrated wild ponies of the Outer Banks are descendants of the Mustangs left behind by early explorers and colonists. More recently, they run wild in places like Shackleford Banks and are resilient from a diet of sea oats and marsh grass. Their centuries old appeal led to the Colonial Spanish Mustang becoming the official state horse in 2010.