NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


43 results for Wastewater management
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
25212
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the North Carolina Coastal Federation symposium on Integrated Coastal Wastewater Management, many activities including a forum were held with many coastal agencies attending.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Winter 1994, p4
Record #:
25220
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Pamlico-Tar River Foundation has developed a report on river discharge and the biggest culprits responsible. The offenses by these culprits are also listed and explained.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 13 Issue 4, Summer 1994, p5, il
Record #:
25231
Author(s):
Abstract:
After several years of violations, the city of Oxford has received a moratorium which will prevent the city from providing sewer service to new customers until the problems with the system have been fixed.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 18 Issue 4, Summer 1999, p1-2, il
Record #:
25251
Author(s):
Abstract:
Matt Tirman explains the benefits of using a decentralized wastewater treatment system over a centralized wastewater treatment system.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 20 Issue 4, Fall 2001, p5, il
Record #:
25272
Author(s):
Abstract:
After talking with Larry Thomas, the Director of Public Works for the City of Oxford, Mary Alsentzer describes what is needed for the Oxford wastewater treatment plant.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Spring 2003, p4, il, por
Record #:
25759
Author(s):
Abstract:
For more than a decade, The Department of Human Resources’ wastewater treatment plant at Butner has dumped polluted water into a tributary of Falls Lake– Raleigh’s drinking water supply which the department is pledged to protect.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 5 Issue 17, September 10-23 1987, p1, 5-10, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
26133
Author(s):
Abstract:
Researchers are trying to find solutions to fecal wastewater problems in coastal North Carolina towns. Mark Sobsey, environmental sciences and engineering professor, is developing better methods to detect bacteria in coastal and inland waterways.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
27926
Author(s):
Abstract:
The wetlands at UNC’s Bingham Facility have been polluted. The facility is facing many violations after storage ponds leaked, pipes broke, and hazardous chemicals were detected in the wastewater treatement system. Neighbors notified regulators of their concerns and UNC appears to have built their wastewater system over wetlands without state and federal permits. The violations will carry a fine if UNC does not offer an explanation and a plan to restore the wetlands or if they do not receive a permit allowing them to ignore the policies.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 19, May 2010, p5-7 Periodical Website
Record #:
28046
Author(s):
Abstract:
New Hill Community Association is the winner of a 2010 Indy Citizen Award for their positive contribution to society in the Triangle area. The association is fighting Western Wake Partners who want to put a wastewater treatment plant in the tiny, unincorporated, historically African-American town. Both black and white residents have joined forces to fight the project. The project would serve Cary, Apex, and Morrisville, but not New Hill and there are options to place the plant away from residents which are not being considered.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 47, November 2010, p21 Periodical Website
Record #:
27998
Author(s):
Abstract:
A new wastewater treatment plant that will serve Cary, Apex, Morrisville, and Holly Springs will be built in New Hill near the town’s historic district. Many of the residents of New Hill won’t be able to use the plant and will have to continue to run on septic systems. The town of New Hill is primarily African-American and the residents closest the plant are majority retirees and elderly. Residents of New Hill express their frustration and discuss their battle against the construction of the plant.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 32, July 2010, p14-19 Periodical Website
Record #:
28060
Author(s):
Abstract:
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is expanding its Resource Research Facility and this has its neighbors worried. UNC-CH did not share the plans with residents, but plans to build eleven new buildings and two wastewater treatment systems on the property. Residents are concerned about the environmental impact of the wastewater treatment systems. Specific ways in which the wastewater treatment systems could affect the local environment and residents near White Cross, NC are detailed.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 26 Issue 45, November 2009, p5-7 Periodical Website
Record #:
28389
Abstract:
Depth profiles are reported for ammonium and phosphorus in sediment pore water and concentrations in surface water along the length of Pocotaligo Swamp in South Carolina. The distributions were examined in relation to effluent from a wastewater treatment plant. Results show that the swamp is nitrogen-limited.
Record #:
28319
Author(s):
Abstract:
The residents of Granville have another fight on their hand. Residents oppose the construction of the National Bio and Agro Defense Facility proposed for construction in Butner, NC by the Department of Homeland Security. Granville residents and the Granville Non-Violent Action Team have defeated repeated government attempts to place undesirable projects in their neighborhoods including an atomic-particle super collider, a hazardous waste incinerator, and a low-level radiation waste facility. The county and its residents will be fighting a large group of influential political forces to keep the facility out of the county. One of the biggest concerns is the potential effect wastewater will have on the water supply.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 41, October 2007, p4, 7 Periodical Website
Record #:
29631
Abstract:
According to the Greenville Utilities Commission, people flush some weird things down their toilets and let strange things go down the drain. Jason Manning, the wastewater treatment plant superintendent, attributes this to the perspective of the average citizen. To maintain the city’s plumbing, pump stations are cleaned and de-clogged every morning.
Source:
Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Fall 2017, p48-49, il, por
Record #:
30941
Abstract:
University of North Carolina's Institute for the Environment and UNC-TV partner to educate teachers, students and the public on how humans and nature can work together to find clean water solutions. The Drinking Water Resilience Interactive Project (DRIP) combines storytelling and technical expertise to promote sustainable water use.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 3, Summer 2016, p30-32, il Periodical Website
Full Text: