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34 results for Groundwater--North Carolina
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Record #:
19303
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hart discusses the location of groundwater in North Carolina and its breakdown of use across the state, as well as the issues that are faced along the coast.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 14 Issue 5, May 1987, p2-3, il Periodical Website
Record #:
25586
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located in Western North Carolina, Bee Tree Cover is listed as one of the 400 worst hazardous waste sites in the nation. Since 1951, the 1,200-acre area is used as a disposal site by four different industries, most recently by Chemtronics, Inc. The groundwater is contaminated with at least 82 chemicals known to be dangerous to human health.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 2 Issue 9, May 11-24 1984, p3, 8, il, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
25610
Author(s):
Abstract:
In Scotland County, overused and abandoned underground gas tanks have been leaking gasoline into the groundwater. Officials found that wells serving 60 families – nearly every household in the county -- were tainted with unsafe levels of ethylene dibromide.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 3 Issue 3, February 15-28 1985, p1, 4-5, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
26608
Author(s):
Abstract:
Groundwater in North Carolina has traditionally remained a pure source of drinking water, capable of human consumption without the treatment required of surface water. However, groundwater is being threatened by pollution, hazardous materials, and waste. The state is now in need of a comprehensive monitoring program and more stringent regulations.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 35 Issue 4, July/Aug 1988, p12-14, il
Record #:
32312
Author(s):
Abstract:
Texas Gulf Sulphur Company’s Beaufort County mining complex is a massive investment toward the recovery and processing of phosphate, a material which forms one of the basic ingredients of fertilizers. The mining complex is situated on an inlet of the Pamlico River, and overlies the Castle Hayne Aquifer. This article discusses concerns over mining operations, groundwater conditions, pollution, and legislation.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 27 Issue 3, Mar 1969, p22-37, il, por
Record #:
33128
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Environmental Protection Agency’s new Ground Water Protection Strategy builds on the principle of state control of the resource, with focused help at the federal level. Objectives of the strategy and steps being taken to implement it were outlined in Raleigh on November 2 by the head of the agency’s recently formed Office of Ground Water Protection, Marian Mlay.
Record #:
33293
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Geological Survey’s second annual National Water Summary released this summer is dedicated to state ground water data. The North Carolina section shows maps and tables of aquifers and major areas of ground water withdrawals. The report also reviews the most significant hydrologic and water-related events of 1984.
Record #:
33300
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Department of Human Resources’ Solid and Hazardous Waste Management Branch published a report on managing contaminated ground water in 1984. The report includes case studies of companies that have changed the way they handle their hazardous wastes, and discusses the existence of groundwater in the five hydrogeologic regions of North Carolina.
Record #:
33345
Author(s):
Abstract:
The radioactive gas radon, a common natural constituent of groundwater in North Carolina, is causing increasing concern nationally as a public health problem. A significant public health risk from cancer is associated with radon in the air and in drinking water. Th Water Resources Research Institute is investigating the occurrence of radon in the state’s groundwater.
Record #:
33403
Author(s):
Abstract:
Groundwater is presently serving a variety of important needs across North Carolina. The most critical importance of groundwater is serving scattered homes, farms, small residential developments and small communities. In eastern North Carolina, groundwater is either the major or the only water source.
Record #:
33462
Abstract:
This article is a summary of presentations made at the September 16 Leaders Conference on Groundwater. Representatives discussed municipal concerns, local government concerns, and industry concerns about groundwater in North Carolina.
Record #:
33469
Abstract:
This article is a summary of presentations made at the fall Leaders Conference on Groundwater. Speakers discussed North Carolina’s groundwater standards and classifications, and current threats to groundwater quality.
Record #:
33473
Author(s):
Abstract:
Groundwater levels in some areas of the North Carolina Coastal Plain have been lowered by over one-hundred feet since the turn of the century, according to a report by the United States Geological Survey. The area studied by this report is centered around the cities of Kinston and Greenville.
Record #:
34080
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Geological Survey, the North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Community Development, and local governments in North Carolina’s Coastal Plain area are cooperating on a study of the hydrology and groundwater resource potential of the Castle Hayne Aquifer in Eastern North Carolina. The study will produce a series of hydrogeologic maps that will be useful in planning and constructing water wells and test holes.
Record #:
34079
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are approximately 222,000 underground storage tanks in North Carolina, thirty-six-percent of which are at risk of failing and leaking their contents into the surrounding earth, threatening to contaminate groundwater. Cleanup of some major pollution incidents may be paid for by a federal trust fund established through Superfund legislation.