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5 results for Water supply--North Carolina, Coastal
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Record #:
19304
Author(s):
Abstract:
On the Outer Banks of North Carolina, water is a finite resource, and managers must plan in advance what systems are used and where the water comes from, especially considering population growth and tourism.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 14 Issue 5, May 1987, p4-6, il Periodical Website
Record #:
33460
Author(s):
Abstract:
A recent report by the North Carolina Division of Environmental Management shows much evidence that water quality across the state has improved substantially over the last two years. One of the major reasons for improvement is the intensive point-source pollution control effort launched in 1972. However, water quality concerns remain for coastal development, watershed protection, water toxicants, and eutrophication.
Record #:
34208
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Water Resources conducted a study at Currituck County Outer Banks in response to property owners requesting a Capacity Use Area designation under the Water Use Act of 1967. This would restrict water withdrawals from the surficial aquifer, which is the sole source of drinking water for Currituck. The study concluded that if a management plan is not prepared by 2000, then the designation should be considered.
Record #:
34320
Author(s):
Abstract:
In cooperation with the Lumber River Council of Governments, the United States Geological Survey assessed the effects of groundwater withdrawals on water levels in the southern Coastal Plain area of the Black Creek aquifer. Between September 1992 and December 1998, groundwater levels were monitored in twenty-one wells screened in Black Creek aquifer throughout Bladen, Hoke, Robeson, and Scotland counties. Results showed that water levels have changed little in most of this area, but have declined in some areas due to pumping.
Record #:
34318
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Water Resources has been documenting declining water levels in the Central Coastal Plain Cretaceous aged aquifers (Upper Cape Fear, Black Creek and Peedee) since the late 1960s and has been discussing the problems of declining aquifer levels with users since 1993. A request for approval of Central Coastal Plain Capacity Use Area rules was delayed until December to allow for fine-tuning and improvements to the rule.