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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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11 results for Gravestones
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Record #:
57
Abstract:
Patterson describes the art work found on gravestones.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 31 Issue 1, Fall 1991, p26-31, il
Record #:
18935
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ruth Little has written a work entitled STICKS AND STONES: THREE CENTURIES OF NORTH CAROLINA GRAVEMARKERS. Although not a catalog of every historic gravemarker in the state, the book does provide a guide to major types of markers, how they have changed over the years, and what they mean.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 110, Winter 1998, p1-2, il, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
22468
Abstract:
The Spratt burying-ground in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina is one of the oldest burying places in the state. Many of the inscriptions on tombstones found in the graveyard pre-date the American Revolution.
Full Text:
Record #:
29887
Abstract:
Don Edwards is completing an inventory of Hatteras Island graveyards and the conditions of the stones. Although many of the graveyards have been overgrown--and some destroyed--Edwards is making an effort to document the graves and their unique tombstones.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p2-5, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
31303
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Cemetery Survey Project is seeking volunteers to record all cemeteries containing graves dated before 1913. The effort began in 1979, when the General Assembly created the Abandoned Cemeteries Study Committee to determine the condition of these forsaken cemeteries throughout the state. Since birth and death statistics were not kept officially in North Carolina before 1913, the only records available for many citizens are in graveyards.
Source:
Record #:
35615
Abstract:
While traveling in Transylvania, Romania, the author took note of the various epitaphs and pictures that were present on tombstones.
Record #:
36893
Abstract:
Crawford is a folklore researcher of all the old families between Waynesville and Bryson City, North Carolina. His work deepens and expands the appreciation, continuation, and study of the cemetery decoration traditions the figure in the lives of the people of Western North Carolina.
Record #:
35942
Abstract:
The grave of Hezekiah Quidley proved his earthly life was over. Reports about mysterious sounds in the woods suggested his love for fiddle playing lived on. Stories about a woman appearing to her former boyfriend after her death also proved things going bump in the night were sometimes restless spirits.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Spring 1974, p44-47
Record #:
37610
Author(s):
Abstract:
Offering new life to an old craft were two North Carolina potters who displayed their version of face jugs during the national craft revival of the 1960s and 1970s. Displaying this pottery’s relevance in ages past was a brief history of face jugs. Noted were purposes such as grave markers warding off evil and moonshine containers warding off children from their contents.
Record #:
38291
Author(s):
Abstract:
Profiled are Calvary Episcopal Church and Churchyard, Tarboro; Old Burying Ground, Beaufort; St. Thomas Episcopal Church, Bath; Oakdale Cemetery, Wilmington. Accompanying photos of cemeteries and tombstones was information such as brief church histories and cemeteries’ unique qualities. As for their tombstones, they are utilitarian and decorative, indicating aspects such as religious affiliation; economic status; relationship to other families in the cemetery; evidence or absence of kinship to the Coastal Plain region’s earliest settlers.
Source:
Record #:
39441
Author(s):
Abstract:
Creech reviews Patterson’s book on gravestones. The gravestones give brief glimpses of the dead that can be linked to anecdotes and legends recorded early by local Presbyterians, helping the author focus on individuals taking roles in crises within the community, enabling him to help the reader see them and their long-vanished world.