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10 results for Sepulchral monuments
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Record #:
57
Abstract:
Patterson describes the art work found on gravestones.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 31 Issue 1, Fall 1991, p26-31, il
Record #:
2025
Author(s):
Abstract:
The tombstones and markers in North Carolina's 75,000 cemeteries, burial grounds, and grave sites are a treasure trove of the state's history and ethnic and cultural diversity.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 11, Apr 1994, p24-26, il
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Record #:
2038
Author(s):
Abstract:
African-American grave markers in New Hanover, Davidson, Lincoln, and Cumberland Counties tend to be creative in style and inscription, yet fragile due to materials used. Traditional markers are the mound, head and foot, enclosure, and sculpture.
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Record #:
3205
Abstract:
Knowledge of tombstone materials, symbols, and designs can reveal much about the deceased. For example, because there was no native stone in coastal Carolina, only the wealthy could afford to order a grave marker from New England prior to the 1830s.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
3199
Abstract:
The coastal region contains some of the oldest and most interesting cemeteries in the state. The Old Burying Ground in Beaufort, graveyards at New Bern's Christ Episcopal Church and Cedar Grove, and Cedar Island cemeteries are profiled.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
3200
Abstract:
History can be read on tombstones in Beaufort's Old Burying Ground and New Bern's Cedar Grove. Among those interred are Otway Burns, William Gaston, Pierre and Annie Henry, and a girl in a keg.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Mar/Apr 1997, p7-10, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
3899
Author(s):
Abstract:
When Ruth Little undertook a two-year study of grave markers, her travels took her across the state and into 550 graveyards in thirty-four counties. The result was STICKS AND STONES, which contains her documentation and description along with pictures by Charlotte photographer Tim Buchman.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 16 Issue 42, Oct 1998, p35, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
9739
Author(s):
Abstract:
Some of the oldest and most interesting cemeteries in the state are in the Coastal Plain. Beaufort's Old Burying Ground is over 200-years-old and contains many interesting gravestones. It is rumored that a young girl is buried there in a keg of rum. Many sea captains and sailors are interred there, including Captain Otway Burns, who commanded the Snapdragon during the War of 1812.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 43 Issue 2, July 1975, p8-9, il
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Record #:
13549
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Abstract:
Thirty unusual grave inscriptions from cemeteries in North Carolina are included in Stories on Stone: A book of American Epitaphs, published by Oxford University Press.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 48, May 1954, p12, f
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Record #:
20359
Author(s):
Abstract:
Inscription on ancient tombstones were of an entirely different type 150 years ago from what they are today. Study of these old monuments not only gives an insight into the way our ancestors thought and felt, but every now and then an oddity of some sort turns up which is interesting in itself. One of the largest of the old cemeteries is that of Steele Creek Presbyterian Church in Mecklenburg County. It covers four acres and the oldest marker dates back to 1760.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 36, Feb 1945, p3-4, 22, il
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