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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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27 results for Ecology
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Record #:
27847
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Shakori Hills GrassRoots Festival in Chatham County is raising money to buy the land it currently leases. The nonprofit that produces the festival cannot afford the land but does not want to leave. The festival is growing each year and its lease is almost up. The problem is explored and compared with other national festivals who have experienced similar issues.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 6, February 2010, p39 Periodical Website
Record #:
28415
Abstract:
Selected high elevation forests and heath balds of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park were comprehensively sampled for the first time. Overall species richness declined with elevation, yet numbers of snails appear to change little with increasing altitude.
Record #:
28430
Author(s):
Abstract:
In North Carolina, dog-day cicadas appear in smaller numbers every year. Observations in a Charlotte, North Carolina suburban neighborhood revealed that the cicadas were being attacked by carpenter ants as they emerged from the ground. Thus, predation is an important regulator of dog-day cicadas.
Subject(s):
Record #:
28419
Abstract:
The spiny water flea (Daphnia lumholtzi) is a potentially invasive species native to Eastern Africa. While its complete distribution in North Carolina is unknown, this is the first report of the flea in B. Everett Jordan Lake, a reservoir in central North Carolina.
Subject(s):
Record #:
28390
Abstract:
Understory vegetation biomass and species richness response to site preparation treatments, fertilization trials and drainage locations in loblolly pine and pond pine plantations were studied in an Eastern North Carolina pocosin. Results indicate whether some ecosystem functions are being lost.
Record #:
28393
Author(s):
Abstract:
A fish inventory in 2004 of Guilford Courthouse National Military Park in Greensboro, North Carolina was conducted by sampling three reaches of the two streams within the park. The fish community was surprisingly diverse, considering alterations and urbanization of surrounding Greensboro.
Record #:
28166
Abstract:
A survey of streams in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park revealed low populations of hellbenders (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis) and mudpuppies (Necturus maculosus). Water quality profiles indicated acidic conditions for Little River and Noland Creek, suggesting that monitoring efforts should be continued.
Record #:
28206
Abstract:
The golden mouse (Ochrotomys nuttalli) ranges across the southeastern United States, and typically prefers habitat consisting of greenbrier and honeysuckle. In the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the golden mouse prefers similar habitats in high elevation grassy balds.
Record #:
28254
Author(s):
Abstract:
A total of twenty-nine scale-bearing Protista were observed from freshwater North and South Carolina sites. While ten of the taxa have been previously reported from the United States, nineteen are new records.
Subject(s):
Record #:
28342
Abstract:
The diversity and seasonal abundance of arthropods (insects and spiders) associated with two old growth and two secondary growth stands of eastern hemlock were assessed in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. More arthropods were captured in secondary growth hemlock stands than in old growth stands.
Subject(s):
Record #:
28343
Abstract:
Coastal and estuarine systems are highly susceptible to species invasions. This study examined the relationship between recruitment and adult communities in Charleston, South Carolina. The non-indigenous Asian green mussel (Perna viridis) was found indicating the need for extended monitoring efforts.
Record #:
28561
Author(s):
Abstract:
Danielle Keller, a doctoral student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Institute of Marine Sciences, describes how changing seagrass cover in North Carolina waters might affect juvenile fish.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2017, p18-19, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
30051
Abstract:
Collections of invertebrate animals and ecological data were made from approximately five-hundred caves in the Appalachian Valley and Ridge province of Virginia and eastern Tennessee from 1961 to 1980. The regional cave faunas consist of species that are related to or also exist in North Carolina and other southeastern states.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 14, June 1988, p1-162, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30075
Author(s):
Abstract:
This paper offers a taxonomic and ecological summary of all known species of Sympotthastia, a genus of non-biting midges in the insect family Chironomidae. Chironomid larvae occur in all types of aquatic or brackish waters. Species found in the Nearctic realm of North Carolina provide additional information on the larval stages of certain species.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 11, Oct 1985, p39-53, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
30091
Author(s):
Abstract:
The eighteen terrestrial isopod crustaceans from North Carolina are reviewed with synonymies, illustrations, distribution maps, ecological notes and a key to species. The species can be divided into species exclusively from the seashore, and species from more upland locations.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 8, Dec 1982, p1-26, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
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