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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for Invasives
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Record #:
20667
Author(s):
Abstract:
New pests and diseases are coming to the Carolinas. One is the brown marmorated stink bug, a native to Asia, which was introduced in the country in 1998. Two types of scale--the oak lecanium and the gloomy scale--attack oaks and red maples respectively. In June, 2013, the emerald ash borer was found in three state counties--Granville, Person, and Vance. This Asian beetle was first found in southeastern Michigan in 2002 and has since spread to eighteen states. Boxwood blight, found in the state in 2012, attacks American and English boxwoods.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
25058
Abstract:
Ballast water is thought to be the cause of the introduction of many non-native species, such as the zebra mussel. A new technology using ozone could be the answer to preventing anymore introductions of new species into non-native waters.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2003, p6-11, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
28419
Abstract:
The spiny water flea (Daphnia lumholtzi) is a potentially invasive species native to Eastern Africa. While its complete distribution in North Carolina is unknown, this is the first report of the flea in B. Everett Jordan Lake, a reservoir in central North Carolina.
Subject(s):
Record #:
28339
Abstract:
The lionfish species Pterois miles and Pterois volitans are popular aquarium fishes that have gained recent notoriety as invasive species along the east coast of the United States and the Bahamas. Results from mitochondrial DNA analyses support their recognition as two separate lionfish species.
Record #:
28343
Abstract:
Coastal and estuarine systems are highly susceptible to species invasions. This study examined the relationship between recruitment and adult communities in Charleston, South Carolina. The non-indigenous Asian green mussel (Perna viridis) was found indicating the need for extended monitoring efforts.
Record #:
29720
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Eastern and Carolina hemlocks, which represent Appalachian culture, are also a keystone contributor to the mountain forest ecology. These hemlock forests are struggling to survive the invasive hemlock wooly adelgid, which feasts only on them. The Hemlock Restoration Initiative in Asheville, North Carolina is working with partners to restore hemlocks and long-term health.
Full Text:
Record #:
31552
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1892, the boll weevil migrated into the United States from Mexico and infested the nation’s cotton industries. For North Carolina cotton farmers, efforts to eradicate the boll weevil with insect control and pesticides are getting more expensive and difficult each year. A three-year weevil eradication experiment is being conducted in Halifax, Edgecombe and Northampton counties to seek a dependable method of eradicating the boll weevil.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 11 Issue 7, July 1979, p14-16, il, por