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12 results for Water resources development--Laws and legislation
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Record #:
991
Author(s):
Abstract:
Local governments in North Carolina must make decisions on five major water management issues: water supply planning, watershed protection, contaminated groundwater, basin-wide planning, and protection of wetlands.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 43 Issue 2, Feb 1993, p1, 8-9, il
Record #:
17645
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1962, the state's population of 4.5 million was already straining the water supply and caused officials to begin reevaluating water pollution laws. The first water protection legislation passed in 1893. Policies evolved over those 49 years and led to the creation of the State Department of Water Resources in 1959.
Source:
Record #:
33130
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Community Development has developed a document that sets forth policy and criteria for instream flows. Its purpose is to establish minimum stream flows for protection of all water users. The document will serve as a guide for the department’s review and regulatory activities and for project developers.
Record #:
33404
Author(s):
Abstract:
United States District Judge Earl W. Britt is expected to issue a summary judgment in the dispute between the State of North Carolina and the City of Virginia Beach over Virginia Beach’s proposal to withdraw water from Lake Gaston for its use. At issue is whether or not an Environmental Impact Statement should have been performed before permits were issued to allow Virginia Beach to proceed with the project.
Record #:
33489
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina residents are recognizing that stormwater runoff from coastal development or soil erosion can cause serious pollution problems. However, there is less public understanding of how urban stormwater runoff contributes to degradation of water quality across the state. The issue of urban stormwater management for water quality purposes presses the need for regulations and legislative revisions.
Record #:
33482
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina legislature is expected to take action on legislation concerning use of phosphate detergent, low-level radioactive waste disposal, hazardous chemical waste treatment and hazardous waste orphan site cleanup, leaking underground storage tanks, landfill regulation, and pesticide contamination.
Record #:
33488
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article presents new water resources legislation in North Carolina. The bills enact the new North Carolina Clean Water Revolving Fund Act of 1987, pollution control permit fees, and a wastewater treatment works permit or bond.
Record #:
34222
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina Senate Bill 875 was introduced to correct fragmented, inconsistent and unfair laws on interbasin transfers. Legislators and water resources experts discussed fundamental questions of water rights and the appropriate roles of local and state governments in water resources management at a forum in June. Among discussion were the riparian rights doctrine, economic and ecological issues.
Record #:
34351
Author(s):
Abstract:
Following a meeting in September with the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission, commissioners question whether it would be a violation of the separation of powers provision of the North Carolina Constitution for the General Assembly to delegate veto power over executive branch rules to an independent commission that it appoints. Rejection by the Rules Review Commission of rules to implement the federal NPDES Stormwater Phase II program could set the stage for several challenges.
Record #:
34349
Author(s):
Abstract:
Speakers at the Water Resources Research Institute’s Annual Conference on April 1 discussed water use laws in North Carolina and the future implications of the state’s current water laws and policy. They also discussed the economic value of water resources, water rights and access to water supplies, and water quality improvement.
Record #:
34353
Author(s):
Abstract:
On January 15, the North Carolina Rules Review Commission (RRC) met to consider revisions made by the Environmental Management Commission to the NPDES Stormwater Phase II rules in response to earlier rejections. After listening to special interest groups, the RRC passed a motion to disapprove rules in the stormwater program. However, it is still unknown which specifically which rules the motion applied to.
Record #:
34355
Author(s):
Abstract:
At the March 11, 2004 meeting of the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission, complaints were filed against the NPDES Stormwater Phase II rules rejected by the Rules Review Commission (RRC). The implications of the RRC action mean that North Carolina has failed to meet federal requirements to adopt procedures for state designation of owners and operators of storm sewer systems that must obtain permits.